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Does Daily Sunshine Make You Happy? Subjective Measures of Well-Being and the Weather

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  • Franz Buscha

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  • Franz Buscha, 2016. "Does Daily Sunshine Make You Happy? Subjective Measures of Well-Being and the Weather," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 84(5), pages 642-663, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:84:y:2016:i:5:p:642-663
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/manc.12126
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frey, Bruno S. & Stutzer, Alois, 2010. "Recent Advances in the Economics of Individual Subjective Well-Being," Working papers 2010/04, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
    2. Andrew J. Oswald, 2010. "Emotional Prosperity and the Stiglitz Commission," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(4), pages 651-669, December.
    3. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Paul Frijters, 2004. "How Important is Methodology for the estimates of the determinants of Happiness?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(497), pages 641-659, July.
    4. Rehdanz, Katrin & Maddison, David, 2005. "Climate and happiness," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 111-125, January.
      • Katrin Rehdanz & David J. Maddison, 2003. "Climate and Happiness," Working Papers FNU-20, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Apr 2003.
    5. Dolan, Paul & Peasgood, Tessa & White, Mathew, 2008. "Do we really know what makes us happy A review of the economic literature on the factors associated with subjective well-being," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 94-122, February.
    6. Christopher J. Boyce & Andrew J. Oswald, 2012. "Do people become healthier after being promoted?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(5), pages 580-596, May.
    7. repec:wsi:ccexxx:v:04:y:2013:i:01:n:s2010007813500048 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Paula K. Lorgelly & Joanne Lindley, 2008. "What is the relationship between income inequality and health? Evidence from the BHPS," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(2), pages 249-265.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cristina Bernini & Alessandro Tampieri, 2017. "The Happiness Function in Italian Cities," CREA Discussion Paper Series 17-07, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.

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