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Is The Consumption–Income Ratio Stationary? Evidence From Linear And Non-Linear Panel Unit Root Tests For Oecd And Non-Oecd Countries

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  • MARIO CERRATO
  • CHRISTIAN DE PERETTI
  • CHRIS STEWART

Abstract

This paper applies recently developed heterogeneous nonlinear and linear panel unit root tests that account for cross-sectional dependence to 24 OECD and 33 non-OECD countries’ consumption-income ratios over the period 1951–2003. We apply a recently developed methodology that facilitates the use of panel tests to identify which individual cross-sectional units are stationary and which are nonstationary. This extends evidence provided in the recent literature to consider both linear and nonlinear adjustment in panel unit root tests, to address the issue of cross-sectional dependence, and to substantially expand both time-series and cross sectional dimensions of the data analysed. We find that the majority (65%) of the series are nonstationary with slightly fewer OECD countries’ (61%) series exhibiting a unit root than non-OECD countries (68%).
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  • Mario Cerrato & Christian De Peretti & Chris Stewart, 2013. "Is The Consumption–Income Ratio Stationary? Evidence From Linear And Non-Linear Panel Unit Root Tests For Oecd And Non-Oecd Countries," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 81(1), pages 102-120, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:81:y:2013:i:1:p:102-120
    DOI: 10.1111/manc.2013.81.issue-1
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    1. Mario Cerrato & Christian De Peretti & Nick Sarantis, 2007. "A nonlinear panel unit root test under cross section dependence," Documents de recherche 07-12, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Goda & Chris Stewart & Alejandro Torres García, 2016. "Absolute Income Inequality and Rising House Prices," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO CIEF 015247, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT.
    2. Nicholas Apergis & Rangan Gupta & Chi Keung Marco Lau & Zinnia Mukherjee, 2016. "An Analysis of the Relationship between U.S. State Level Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Health Care Expenditure," Working Papers 201618, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. Holmes, Mark J. & Otero, Jesús, 2014. "Re-examining the Feldstein–Horioka and Sachs' views of capital mobility: A heterogeneous panel setup," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 1-11.
    4. Apergis, Nicholas & Lau, Marco Chi Keung, 2015. "Structural breaks and electricity prices: Further evidence on the role of climate policy uncertainties in the Australian electricity market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(PA), pages 176-182.
    5. Holmes, Mark J. & Shen, Xin, 2013. "A note on the average propensity to consume, wealth and threshold adjustment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 309-313.
    6. Mark J. HOLMES & Xin SHEN, 2015. "On Wealth Volatility, Asymmetries And The Average Propensity To Consume In The United States," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 15(1), pages 69-78.

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