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Trade Union Availability and Trade Union Membership in Britain

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  • Green, Francis

Abstract

The determinants of union availability and union membership are jointly estimated in a bivariate probit model, in which union availability at the workplace is regarded as a condition for the membership decision of an employee. A notable result concerns the impact of gender: being female significantly reduces the probability of having a recognized union to join, but has an insignificant impact on the likelihood of becoming a member when a union is available at work. The paper concludes also that the structural characteristics of jobs remain very important in the determination of union numbers. Copyright 1990 by Blackwell Publishers Ltd and The Victoria University of Manchester

Suggested Citation

  • Green, Francis, 1990. "Trade Union Availability and Trade Union Membership in Britain," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 58(4), pages 378-394, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manch2:v:58:y:1990:i:4:p:378-94
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    Cited by:

    1. Jo Blanden & Stephen Machin, 2003. "Cross-Generation Correlations of Union Status for Young People in Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 41(3), pages 391-415, September.
    2. A Charlwood, 2001. "Why Do Non-Union Employees Want To Unionise? Evidence from Britain," CEP Discussion Papers dp0498, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Robin Naylor, 1995. "Unions in Decline?," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 22, pages 127-142.
    4. Magnani, Elisabetta & Prentice, David, 2003. "Did globalization reduce unionization? Evidence from US manufacturing," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(6), pages 705-726, December.
    5. Alex Bryson & Rafael Gomez, 2003. "Why Have Workers Stopped Joining Unions?," CEP Discussion Papers dp0589, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    6. Rupayan PAL, 2010. "Impact Of Communist Parties On The Individual Decision To Join A Trade Union: Evidence From India," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 48(4), pages 496-528, December.
    7. Martyn Andrews & Robin Naylor, 1994. "Declining Union Density in the 1980s: What Do Panel Data Tell Us?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 32(3), pages 413-432, September.
    8. Jeremy Waddington, 1992. "Trade Union Membership in Britain, 1980–1987: Unemployment and Restructuring," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 287-324, June.
    9. Rupayan Pal, 2008. "Estimating the Probability of Trade Union Membership in India: Impact of Communist Parties, Personal Attributes and Industrial Characteristics," Working Papers id:1669, eSocialSciences.
    10. Diane M. Sinclair, 1995. "The Importance of Sex for the Propensity to Unionize," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 33(2), pages 173-190, June.
    11. Dribbusch, Heiner, 2005. "Trade Union Organising in Private Sector Services : Findings from the British, Dutch and German retail industry," WSI Working Papers 136, The Institute of Economic and Social Research (WSI), Hans-Böckler-Foundation.

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