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Retail Amenities And Urban Sprawl

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  • Stefan Dodds
  • Mati Dubrovinsky

Abstract

type="main"> This paper examines the interaction between local retail markets and population density in cities. We demonstrate that welfare costs of urban sprawl need not come only from road congestion or environmental externalities, as often suggested in the literature. A city also forgoes potential agglomeration economies in retail when it settles into a spatially sprawling equilibrium. Our theory predicts an additional spatial equilibrium where the city is inefficiently dense, characterized by strong retail agglomeration economies within the core.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefan Dodds & Mati Dubrovinsky, 2015. "Retail Amenities And Urban Sprawl," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 280-297, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:55:y:2015:i:2:p:280-297
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jors.12146
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Muhammad Adil Rauf & Olaf Weber, 0. "Urban infrastructure finance and its relationship to land markets, land development, and sustainability: a case study of the city of Islamabad, Pakistan," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-19.

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