IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/jregsc/v54y2014i4p688-710.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Geography Of Fringe Banking

Author

Listed:
  • Anping Chen
  • Marlon Boarnet
  • Mark Partridge
  • Christopher S. Fowler
  • Jane K. Cover
  • Rachel Garshick Kleit

Abstract

type="main"> U.S. financial services are bifurcated into a traditional banking sector that serves wealthier individuals and a less regulated alternative financial services sector (payday lenders, check cashers, etc.) catering to lower income individuals. What determines the spatial distribution of fringe banks? First, at the county level, fringe banks do not fill a spatial void in traditional services. Second, whether fringe providers disproportionately locate in counties with more minorities depends on the service and the minority population. Finally, pawnshop prevalence is shaped by restrictions on interest and fees, but the location of payday lenders and check cashers is not sensitive to such regulation.

Suggested Citation

  • Anping Chen & Marlon Boarnet & Mark Partridge & Christopher S. Fowler & Jane K. Cover & Rachel Garshick Kleit, 2014. "The Geography Of Fringe Banking," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(4), pages 688-710, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:54:y:2014:i:4:p:688-710
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jors.12144
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Burkey, Mark L. & Simkins, Scott P., 2004. "Factors Affecting the Location of Payday Lending and Traditional Banking Services in North Carolina," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 34(2), pages 191-205.
    2. Donald P. Morgan, 2007. "Defining and detecting predatory lending," Staff Reports 273, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    3. H. Damar, 2009. "Why Do Payday Lenders Enter Local Markets? Evidence from Oregon," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 34(2), pages 173-191, March.
    4. Haining, Robert & Law, Jane & Griffith, Daniel, 2009. "Modelling small area counts in the presence of overdispersion and spatial autocorrelation," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 53(8), pages 2923-2937, June.
    5. Mitchell A. Petersen, 2009. "Estimating Standard Errors in Finance Panel Data Sets: Comparing Approaches," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(1), pages 435-480, January.
    6. Zinman, Jonathan, 2010. "Restricting consumer credit access: Household survey evidence on effects around the Oregon rate cap," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 546-556, March.
    7. Donald P. Morgan & Michael R. Strain & Ihab Seblani, 2012. "How Payday Credit Access Affects Overdrafts and Other Outcomes," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44, pages 519-531, March.
    8. Michael A. Stegman & Robert Faris, 2003. "Payday Lending: A Business Model that Encourages Chronic Borrowing," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 17(1), pages 8-32, February.
    9. Smith, Tony E. & Smith, Marvin M. & Wackes, John, 2008. "Alternative financial service providers and the spatial void hypothesis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 205-227, May.
    10. Joshua Shackman & Glen Tenney, 2006. "The Effects of Government Regulations on the Supply of Pawn Loans: Evidence from 51 Jurisdictions in the U.S," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 30(1), pages 69-91, August.
    11. Michael R. Strain & Donald P. Morgan, 2007. "Payday holiday: how households fare after payday credit bans," Staff Reports 309, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    12. Joshua Shackman & Glen Tenney, 2006. "The Effects of Government Regulations on the Supply of Pawn Loans: Evidence from 51 Jurisdictions in the U.S," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 30(2), pages 229-229, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Scott W. Hegerty, 2016. "Commercial bank locations and “banking deserts”: a statistical analysis of Milwaukee and Buffalo," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 56(1), pages 253-271, January.
    2. Scott Hegerty, 2016. "Commercial bank locations and “banking deserts”: a statistical analysis of Milwaukee and Buffalo," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 56(1), pages 253-271, January.
    3. Goodstein, Ryan M. & Rhine, Sherrie L.W., 2017. "The effects of bank and nonbank provider locations on household use of financial transaction services," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 91-107.
    4. Craig Gundersen & David R. Just & Katie Fitzpatrick, 2017. "Bank Accounts, Nonbank Financial Transaction Products, and Food Insecurity among Households with Children," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 631-658, November.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:54:y:2014:i:4:p:688-710. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0022-4146 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.