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The Joint Choice Of An Individual'S Occupation And Destination

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Abstract

This study examines the relationship between an individual's occupation choice and destination choice. It portrays the relationship as an interaction between the supply of occupational skills by individuals and demand by different labor-market regions. The unusual merger of a multinomial logit model of occupational choice and the conditional logit model of destination choice in a simultaneous equation framework requires derivation of a unique variance-covariance matrix. Results indicate strong association between supply of (migration) and demand for (industry mix) an individual's occupational skills. These effects are especially strong for destinations experiencing slow economic growth, while relatively unimportant for high-growth locations. Copyright (c) 2008, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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  • , 2008. "The Joint Choice Of An Individual'S Occupation And Destination," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(5), pages 893-919.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:48:y:2008:i:5:p:893-919
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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Nowotny, 2011. "Welfare Magnets, Taxation and the Location Decisions of Migrants to the EU," WIFO Working Papers 393, WIFO.
    2. Peter Huber & Klaus Nowotny & Julia Bock-Schappelwein, 2010. "Qualification Structure, Over- and Underqualification of the Foreign Born in Austria and the EU," FIW Research Reports series II-008, FIW.
    3. Klaus Nowotny & Dieter Pennerstorfer, 2011. "Ethnic Networks and the Location Choice of Migrants in Europe," WIFO Working Papers 415, WIFO.
    4. Nowotny, Klaus, 2013. "Institutions and the Location Decisions of Highly Skilled Migrants to Europe," Working Papers in Economics 2013-3, University of Salzburg.
    5. Anil Rupasingha & Yongzheng Liu & Mark Partridge, 2015. "Rural Bound: Determinants of Metro to Non-Metro Migration in the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(3), pages 680-700.
    6. W. Mark Brown & Darren M. Scott, 2012. "Human Capital Location Choice: Accounting For Amenities And Thick Labor Markets," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(5), pages 787-808, December.
    7. Anita Alves Pena, 2014. "Undocumented Immigrants And The Welfare State: The Case Of Regional Migration And U.S. Agricultural Labor," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 96-113, January.
    8. Mika Haapanen & Hannu Tervo, 2012. "Migration Of The Highly Educated: Evidence From Residence Spells Of University Graduates," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(4), pages 587-605, October.

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