IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/jregsc/v54y2014i1p96-113.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Undocumented Immigrants And The Welfare State: The Case Of Regional Migration And U.S. Agricultural Labor

Author

Listed:
  • Anita Alves Pena

Abstract

type="main"> A common perception is that immigrants, including illegal immigrants, use disproportionate public aid and select locations based on characteristics of services offered. This paper asks to what extent geographic clustering of undocumented immigrant agricultural laborers in the U.S. is correlated with take-up of public aid broadly defined. Evidence from a nationally representative farmworker survey does not support welfare migration for undocumented immigrants, who have been previously unidentifiable in the literature. The paper, therefore, challenges existing notions of welfare migration by illegal immigrants that have inspired state-level public policy initiatives.

Suggested Citation

  • Anita Alves Pena, 2014. "Undocumented Immigrants And The Welfare State: The Case Of Regional Migration And U.S. Agricultural Labor," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 96-113, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:54:y:2014:i:1:p:96-113
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jors.12049
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416-416.
    2. Gathmann, Christina, 2008. "Effects of enforcement on illegal markets: Evidence from migrant smuggling along the southwestern border," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(10-11), pages 1926-1941, October.
    3. Christiadi & Brian Cushing, 2008. "The Joint Choice Of An Individual'S Occupation And Destination," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(5), pages 893-919, December.
    4. Borjas, George J, 1999. "Immigration and Welfare Magnets," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages 607-637, October.
    5. Kaivan Munshi, 2003. "Networks in the Modern Economy: Mexican Migrants in the U. S. Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(2), pages 549-599.
    6. Daniel Chiquiar & Gordon H. Hanson, 2005. "International Migration, Self-Selection, and the Distribution of Wages: Evidence from Mexico and the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(2), pages 239-281, April.
    7. Jeremiah M. Allen & B. Curtis Eaton, 2005. "Incomplete Information and Migration: the Grass is Greener Across the Higher Fence," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 1-19, February.
    8. Borjas, George J. & Bronars, Stephen G. & Trejo, Stephen J., 1992. "Self-selection and internal migration in the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 159-185, September.
    9. Orrenius, Pia M. & Zavodny, Madeline, 2005. "Self-selection among undocumented immigrants from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 215-240, October.
    10. Buckley, F. H., 1996. "The political economy of immigration policies," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 81-99, March.
    11. Darren M. Scott & Paul A. Coomes & Alexei I. Izyumov, 2005. "The Location Choice of Employment‐based Immigrants among U.S. Metro Areas," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 113-145, February.
    12. Dodson, Marvin E., 2001. "Welfare generosity and location choices among new United States immigrants," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 47-67, March.
    13. Kaestner, Robert & Kaushal, Neeraj & Van Ryzin, Gregg, 2003. "Migration consequences of welfare reform," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 357-376, May.
    14. Neeraj Kaushal, 2005. "New Immigrants' Location Choices: Magnets without Welfare," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(1), pages 59-80, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu & Pinto, Santiago M., 2015. "Illegal Immigration and Fiscal Competition," IZA Discussion Papers 9061, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:54:y:2014:i:1:p:96-113. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0022-4146 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.