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EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION ON PRODUCTIVITY AND INDUSTRY GROWTH: A STUDY OF STEEL REFINING FURNACES -super-

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  • TSUYOSHI NAKAMURA
  • HIROSHI OHASHI

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of new technology on plant-level productivity in the Japanese steel industry during the 1950's and 1960's. We estimate the production function, considering the differences in technology between the refining furnaces owned by a plant. We find that a more productive plant was likely to adopt the new technology and that the adoption would be expected to occur immediately following the peak of the productivity level achieved with the old technology. The adoption of the new technology primarily accounted not only for the industry's productivity slowdown but also for the industry's remarkable growth. Copyright 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. and the Editorial Board of The Journal of Industrial Economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Tsuyoshi Nakamura & Hiroshi Ohashi, 2008. "EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION ON PRODUCTIVITY AND INDUSTRY GROWTH: A STUDY OF STEEL REFINING FURNACES -super-," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(3), pages 470-499, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jindec:v:56:y:2008:i:3:p:470-499
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tsuyoshi Nakamura & Hiroshi Ohashi, 2011. "Matrix Exponential Stochastic Volatility with Cross Leverage," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-813, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    2. Shuhei Aoki & Julen Esteban-Pretel & Tetsuji Okazaki & Yasuyuki Sawada, 2009. "The Role of the Government in Facilitating TFP Growth during Japan's Rapid Growth Era," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-622, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

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