IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/jconsa/v49y2015i2p472-487.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Integration of a Financial Literacy Curriculum in a High School Economics Class: Implications of Varying the Input Mix from an Experiment

Author

Listed:
  • ANDREW GILL
  • RADHA BHATTACHARYA

Abstract

type="main" xml:id="joca12048-abs-0001"> We taught a mere seven-period financial literacy curriculum to two 12th grade economics classes, where one treatment was Financial Fitness for Life-super-® (FFFL)-intensive and the other was “stock market learning” (SML)-intensive. Two control groups received no financial literacy treatment—an 11th grade group with no exposure to economics and a 12th grade economics class. The 12th grade economics classes, i.e., the two treatment groups and one control group, also worked on identical stock market portfolio assignments that their teachers required independently of our curriculum. In a test of overall financial knowledge, the FFFL-intensive group outscored both control groups and the SML-intensive groups, even on questions that were not taught in our curriculum. We conclude that an FFFL-intensive input mix was beneficial in directly adding to financial knowledge and also in terms of leading to spillovers in such knowledge.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Gill & Radha Bhattacharya, 2015. "Integration of a Financial Literacy Curriculum in a High School Economics Class: Implications of Varying the Input Mix from an Experiment," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(2), pages 472-487, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jconsa:v:49:y:2015:i:2:p:472-487
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/joca.12048
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cynthia Harter & John F.R. Harter, 2010. "Is Financial Literacy Improved by Participating in a Stock Market Game?," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 10(1), pages 21-32, Summer.
    2. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2008. "Planning and Financial Literacy: How Do Women Fare?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 413-417, May.
    3. Andrew T. Hill & Bonnie T. Meszaros & Brian Tyson, 2012. "Evidence of Student Achievement in a High School Personal Finance Course," Working Papers 13-01, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    4. Mitchell, Olivia S. & Lusardi, Annamaria (ed.), 2011. "Financial Literacy: Implications for Retirement Security and the Financial Marketplace," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199696819.
    5. Renee Courtois, 2009. "Learning curves : the economics behind high school economic education," Econ Focus, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Win, pages 28-32.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:oup:wbecrv:v:31:y:2017:i:3:p:611-630. is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:soceco:v:74:y:2018:i:c:p:104-111 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Tim Kaiser & Lukas Menkhoff, 2017. "Does Financial Education Impact Financial Literacy and Financial Behavior, and If So, When?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(3), pages 611-630.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jconsa:v:49:y:2015:i:2:p:472-487. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0022-0078 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.