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European Monetary Integration and the Incompatibility of National Varieties of Capitalism

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  • Alison Johnston
  • Aidan Regan

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  • Alison Johnston & Aidan Regan, 2016. "European Monetary Integration and the Incompatibility of National Varieties of Capitalism," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 318-336, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jcmkts:v:54:y:2016:i:2:p:318-336
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jcms.12289
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Andrea Herrmann, 2005. "Converging Divergence: How Competitive Advantages Condition Institutional Change under EMU," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(2), pages 287-310, June.
    2. E.O. Svensson, Lars, 1994. "Why exchange rate bands? : Monetary independence in spite of fixed exchange rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 157-199, February.
    3. Belke, Ansgar & Dreger, Christian, 2011. "Current account imbalances in the euro area: Catching up or competitiveness?," Discussion Papers 297, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Department of Business Administration and Economics.
    4. Sebastian Dullien, 2003. "Is Small Really Beautiful? Explaining Different Unemployment Performances within the Euro-Zone," European Political Economy Review, European Political Economy Infrastructure Consortium, vol. 1(Autumn), pages 126-151.
    5. Hochreiter, Eduard & Winckler, Georg, 1995. "The advantages of tying Austria's hands: The success of the hard currency strategy," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 83-111, March.
    6. Aidan Regan, 2014. "What Explains Ireland’s Fragile Recovery from the Crisis? The Politics of Comparative Institutional Advantage," CESifo Forum, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(02), pages 26-31, April.
    7. Gros, Daniel, 2012. "Macroeconomic Imbalances in the Euro Area: Symptom or cause of the crisis?," CEPS Papers 6865, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    8. Philip R. Lane, 2012. "The European Sovereign Debt Crisis," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(3), pages 49-68, Summer.
    9. Alison Johnston, 2012. "European Economic and Monetary Union’s perverse effects on sectoral wage inflation: Negative feedback effects from institutional change?," European Union Politics, , vol. 13(3), pages 345-366, September.
    10. Beck, Nathaniel & Katz, Jonathan N., 1995. "What To Do (and Not to Do) with Time-Series Cross-Section Data," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 89(3), pages 634-647, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Scharpf, Fritz W., 2017. "Vom asymmetrischen Euro-Regime in die Transferunion: Und was die deutsche Politik dagegen tun könnte," MPIfG Discussion Paper 17/15, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    2. Martin Gächter & Alexander Gruber & Aleksandra Riedl, 2017. "Wage Divergence, Business Cycle Co-Movement and the Currency Union Effect," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(6), pages 1322-1342, November.
    3. Gächter, Martin & Ramskogler, Paul & Riedl, Aleksandra, 2018. "The trinity of wage setting in EMU: A policy proposal," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 284-304.
    4. Engelbert Stockhammer & Syed Mohib Ali, 2018. "Varieties of Capitalism and post-Keynesian economics on Euro crisis," Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft - WuG, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, Abteilung Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Statistik, vol. 44(3), pages 349-370.
    5. Karsten Kohler & Engelbert Stockhammer, 2020. "Growth models in advanced countries before and after the 2008 crisis: competitiveness, financial cycles and austerity," Working Papers PKWP2008, Post Keynesian Economics Society (PKES).
    6. Claudius Gräbner & Philipp Heimberger & Jakob Kapeller & Bernhard Schütz, 2018. "Structural Change in Times of Increasing Openness," wiiw Working Papers 143, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    7. Höpner, Martin, 2019. "The German undervaluation regime under Bretton Woods: How Germany became the nightmare of the world economy," MPIfG Discussion Paper 19/1, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    8. Acocella, Nicola, 2020. "To Exit or not to Exit (from the EMU)?," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 73(1), pages 1-20.
    9. Sotirios Zartaloudis & Andreas Kornelakis, 2017. "Flexicurity between Europeanization and Varieties of Capitalism? A Comparative Analysis of Employment Protection Reforms in Portugal and Greece," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(5), pages 1144-1161, September.
    10. Philipp Genschel & Markus Jachtenfuchs, 2017. "From market integration to core state powers: the Eurozone crisis, the refugee crisis and integration theory," RSCAS Working Papers 2017/26, European University Institute.
    11. Aidan Regan & Samuel Brazys, 2017. "Celtic phoenix or leprechaun economics? The politics of an FDI led growth model in Europe," Working Papers 201701, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    12. Scharpf, Fritz W., 2016. "Forced structural convergence in the eurozone: Or a differentiated European monetary community," MPIfG Discussion Paper 16/15, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    13. Baccaro, Lucio & Pontusson, Jonas, 2018. "Comparative political economy and varieties of macroeconomics," MPIfG Discussion Paper 18/10, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    14. Braun, Benjamin & Deeg, Richard, 2019. "Strong firms, weak banks: The financial consequences of Germany's export-led growth model," MPIfG Discussion Paper 19/5, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.

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