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Organising young workers in the Public and Commercial Services union

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  • Andy Hodder

Abstract

This article analyses the relationship between unions and young workers using the Public and Commercial Services (PCS) union as a case study. PCS is leading the way in terms of engaging with and representing young workers. However, its future success may be limited due to changes to the external environment.

Suggested Citation

  • Andy Hodder, 2014. "Organising young workers in the Public and Commercial Services union," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 153-168, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:indrel:v:45:y:2014:i:2:p:153-168
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/irj.12049
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jo Blanden & Stephen Machin, 2003. "Cross-Generation Correlations of Union Status for Young People in Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 41(3), pages 391-415, September.
    2. Rafael Gomez & Morley Gunderson & Noah Meltz, 2002. "Comparing Youth and Adult Desire for Unionization in Canada," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 40(3), pages 542-519, September.
    3. Bryson, Alex & Gomez, Rafael, 2005. "Why have workers stopped joining unions? Accounting for the rise in never-membership in Britain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 360, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Ian Fitzgerald & Jane Hardy, 2010. "'Thinking Outside the Box'? Trade Union Organizing Strategies and Polish Migrant Workers in the United Kingdom," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(1), pages 131-150, March.
    5. Christina Cregan & Stewart Johnston, 1990. "An Industrial Relations Approach to the Free Rider Problem: Young People and Trade Union Membership in the UK," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 28(1), pages 84-104, March.
    6. Peter Haynes & Jack Vowles & Peter Boxall, 2005. "Explaining the Younger- Older Worker Union Density Gap: Evidence from New Zealand," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 93-116, March.
    7. Bryson, Alex & Gomez, Rafael & Willman, Paul, 2010. "Online social networking and trade union membership: what the Facebook phenomenon truly means for labor organizers," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 27771, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:indrel:v:48:y:2017:i:1:p:42-55 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mélanie Dufour-Poirier & Mélanie Laroche, 2015. "Revitalising young workers' union participation: a comparative analysis of two organisations in Quebec (Canada)," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(5-6), pages 418-433, November.

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