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China and the Great Doubling: Racing to the Top or Bottom of Global Labour Standards?

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  • Edward Whitfield

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  • Edward Whitfield, 2016. "China and the Great Doubling: Racing to the Top or Bottom of Global Labour Standards?," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 7(1), pages 37-45, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:glopol:v:7:y:2016:i:1:p:37-45
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/1758-5899.12252
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Franco Modigliani & Shi Larry Cao, 2004. "The Chinese Saving Puzzle and the Life-Cycle Hypothesis," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(1), pages 145-170, March.
    2. Justin Yifu Lin, 2013. "From Flying Geese to Leading Dragons: New Opportunities and Strategies for Structural Transformation in Developing Countries," International Economic Association Series, in: Joseph E. Stiglitz & Justin Lin Yifu & Ebrahim Patel (ed.), The Industrial Policy Revolution II, chapter 1, pages 50-70, Palgrave Macmillan.
    3. Mr. Yifei Huang & Gewei Wang & Mr. Prakash Loungani, 2014. "Minimum Wages and Firm Employment: Evidence from China," IMF Working Papers 2014/184, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Dennis Tao Yang & Vivian Weijia Chen & Ryan Monarch, 2010. "Rising Wages: Has China Lost Its Global Labor Advantage?," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(4), pages 482-504, October.
    5. Davies, Ronald B. & Vadlamannati, Krishna Chaitanya, 2013. "A race to the bottom in labor standards? An empirical investigation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 1-14.
    6. Branko Milanovic, 2014. "The Return of "Patrimonial Capitalism": A Review of Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(2), pages 519-534, June.
    7. Olney, William W., 2013. "A race to the bottom? Employment protection and foreign direct investment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 191-203.
    8. David Dollar & Benjamin F. Jones, 2013. "China: An Institutional View of an Unusual Macroeconomy," NBER Working Papers 19662, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Mr. Papa M N'Diaye & Ms. Mitali Das, 2013. "Chronicle of a Decline Foretold: Has China Reached the Lewis Turning Point?," IMF Working Papers 2013/026, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Xiaobing Wang & Nick Weaver, 2013. "Surplus labour and Lewis turning points in China," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(1), pages 1-12, February.
    11. Dollar, David, 2007. "Poverty, inequality, and social disparities during China's economic reform," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4253, The World Bank.
    12. Milanovic, Branko, 2014. "The return of"patrimonial capitalism": review of Thomas Piketty's capital in the 21st century," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6974, The World Bank.
    13. Kuijs, Louis, 2005. "Investment and saving in China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3633, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Xu, Xiang & Li, David Daokui & Zhao, Mofei, 2018. "“Made in China” matters: Integration of the global labor market and the global labor share decline," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 16-29.

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