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Macroprudential Policies and Financial Stability

  • ANDREW HUGHES HALLETT
  • JAN LIBICH
  • PETR STEHLÍK

The paper attempts to assess to what extent the central bank or the government should respond to developments that can cause financial instability, such as housing or asset bubbles, overextended budgetary policies, or excessive public and household debt. To analyse this question we set up a simple reduced-form model in which monetary and fiscal policy interact, and imbalances (bubbles) can occur in the medium-run. Considering several scenarios with both benevolent and idiosyncratic policy-makers, the analysis shows that the answer depends on a number of characteristics of the economy, as well as on the monetary and fiscal policy preferences with respect to inflation and output stabilization. We show that socially optimal financial instability prevention should be carried out by: (i) both monetary and fiscal policy (sharing region) under some circumstances, and (ii) fiscal policy only (specialization region) under others. There is however a moral hazard problem: both policy-makers have an incentive to be insufficiently pro-active in safeguarding financial stability, and shift the responsibility to the other policy. Specifically, under a range of circumstances we obtain a situation in which neither policy mitigates instability threats (indifference region). These results can be related to the build-up of the current global financial crisis, and have strong implications for the optimal design of the delegation process.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1475-4932.2010.00692.x
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Article provided by The Economic Society of Australia in its journal The Economic Record.

Volume (Year): 87 (2011)
Issue (Month): 277 (06)
Pages: 318-334

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:87:y:2011:i:277:p:318-334
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  1. Faia, Ester & Monacelli, Tommaso, 2007. "Optimal interest rate rules, asset prices, and credit frictions," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 3228-3254, October.
  2. Jon Faust & Lars E.O. Svensson, 1999. "The equilibrium degree of transparency and control in monetary policy," International Finance Discussion Papers 651, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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  5. Hughes Hallett, Andrew & Libich, Jan & Stehlík, Petr, 2009. "Rogoff revisited: The conservative central banker proposition under active fiscal policies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 140-143, September.
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  7. Andrew Hughes Hallett & Jan Libich & Petr Stehlík, 2011. "Welfare Improving Coordination of Fiscal and Monetary Policy," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 5(1), pages 007-026, March.
  8. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 2001. "Should Central Banks Respond to Movements in Asset Prices?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 253-257, May.
  9. Olivier Jeanne & Michael D. Bordo, 2002. "Monetary Policy and Asset Prices; Does "Benign Neglect" Make Sense?," IMF Working Papers 02/225, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Andrew Hughes Hallett & Jan Libich & Petr Stehlik, 2007. "Rogoff Revisited: The Conservative Central Banker Proposition Under Active Fiscal Policies," CAMA Working Papers 2007-20, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  11. Frederic S. Mishkin, 2001. "The Transmission Mechanism and the Role of Asset Prices in Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 8617, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Charles Bean, 2003. "Asset prices, financial imbalances and monetary policy: are inflation targets enough?," BIS Working Papers 140, Bank for International Settlements.
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