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Consumption Externalities in a Commercial Fishery: The Queensland Beam Trawl Fishery


  • Campbell, H F
  • Reid, C R M


Demand and contingent valuation models are used to analyze survey data obtained from a sample of recreational boat and shore fishers in southern Queensland. The value of the recreational fishery to the average fisher in the sample and the value of marginal increases in catches of target species are estimated. These estimates are used to calculate the value of Pigovian taxes representing the marginal cost of catch and congestion externalities imposed by the beam trawl fishery on the recreational fishery. The results suggest that the cost of these externalities does not justify the closure of the beam trawl fishery. Copyright 2000 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Campbell, H F & Reid, C R M, 2000. "Consumption Externalities in a Commercial Fishery: The Queensland Beam Trawl Fishery," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 76(232), pages 1-14, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:76:y:2000:i:232:p:1-14

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tran Huu Tuan & Henrik Lindhjem, 2008. "Meta-analysis of nature conservation values in Asia & Oceania: Data heterogeneity and benefit transfer issues," EEPSEA Research Report rr2008072, Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA), revised Jul 2008.

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