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Are political and economic integration intertwined?

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Listed:
  • Bernt Bratsberg
  • Giovanni Facchini
  • Tommaso Frattini
  • Anna Cecilia Rosso

Abstract

Economic incentives play a key role in the decision to run for office, but little is known on how they shape immigrants' self‐selection into candidacy. We study this question using a two‐period Roy model, and show that if returns to labour market experience differ between migrants and natives, then this will affect the relative likelihood to run for office for the two groups. We assess this prediction empirically using administrative data from Norway, a country with a very liberal regime for participation in local elections. Our results strongly support our theoretical model and indicate that immigrants' political and economic integration are closely intertwined.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernt Bratsberg & Giovanni Facchini & Tommaso Frattini & Anna Cecilia Rosso, 2023. "Are political and economic integration intertwined?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 90(360), pages 1265-1306, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:90:y:2023:i:360:p:1265-1306
    DOI: 10.1111/ecca.12482
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets
    • P16 - Political Economy and Comparative Economic Systems - - Capitalist Economies - - - Capitalist Institutions; Welfare State

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