IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

On The Efficiency Of Ac/Dc: Bon Scott Versus Brian Johnson




"We use tools from experimental economics to address the age-old debate regarding who was a better singer in the band AC/DC. Our results suggest that (using wealth maximization as a measure of "better") listening to Brian Johnson (relative to listening to Bon Scott) resulted in "better" outcomes in an ultimatum game. These results may have important implications for settling drunken music debates and environmental design issues in organizations. "("JEL "C7, C9, D6, Z1) Copyright (c) 2008 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert J. Oxoby, 2009. "On The Efficiency Of Ac/Dc: Bon Scott Versus Brian Johnson," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 47(3), pages 598-602, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:47:y:2009:i:3:p:598-602

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gary Charness & Matthew Rabin, 2002. "Understanding Social Preferences with Simple Tests," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(3), pages 817-869.
    2. Ernst Fehr & Klaus M. Schmidt, 1999. "A Theory of Fairness, Competition, and Cooperation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(3), pages 817-868.
    3. Snower, Dennis J, 1982. "Macroeconomic Policy and the Optimal Destruction of Vampires," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(3), pages 647-655, June.
    4. Axel Ockenfels & Gary E. Bolton, 2000. "ERC: A Theory of Equity, Reciprocity, and Competition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 166-193, March.
    5. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
    6. Oxoby, Robert J. & McLeish, Kendra N., 2004. "Sequential decision and strategy vector methods in ultimatum bargaining: evidence on the strength of other-regarding behavior," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 84(3), pages 399-405, September.
    7. McAfee, R Preston, 1983. "American Economic Growth and the Voyage of Columbus," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(4), pages 735-740, September.
    8. Blinder, Alan S, 1974. "The Economics of Brushing Teeth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(4), pages 887-891, July/Aug..
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. David L. Dickinson & Todd McElroy, 2009. "Flying Airplanes: Realizing Circadian Effects (FARCE)," Working Papers 09-16, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Z19 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Other
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:47:y:2009:i:3:p:598-602. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christopher F. Baum) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.