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Labor Market Effects Of Employer-Provided Health Insurance




"This is an experimental study in economics of mandated benefits. Most individuals who have health insurance in the United States obtain it through their employer. Some states require employers to provide insurance to certain types of workers. We used an experimental laboratory to investigate possible effects of alternative health insurance regulations on the competitive labor market performance. We found that mandating the insurance for all workers creates labor market distortions, whereas mandating the insurance only for full-time workers leads to a higher coverage than under no mandate, an increased number of part-time workers, but does not necessarily lower market efficiency." ("JEL" C92, I18, J2) Copyright 2006 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Katerina Sherstyuk & Yoav Wachsman & Gerard Russo, 2007. "Labor Market Effects Of Employer-Provided Health Insurance," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(3), pages 538-556, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:45:y:2007:i:3:p:538-556

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Woodbury, Stephen A, 1983. "Substitution between Wage and Nonwage Benefits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 166-182, March.
    2. Isaac, R Mark & Plott, Charles R, 1981. "Price Controls and the Behavior of Auction Markets: An Experimental Examination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 448-459, June.
    3. Charles R. Plott, 1997. "Laboratory Experimental Testbeds: Application to the PCS Auction," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(3), pages 605-638, September.
    4. Ernst Fehr & Armin Falk, 1999. "Wage Rigidity in a Competitive Incomplete Contract Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(1), pages 106-134, February.
    5. Pauly, Mark V, 1986. "Taxation, Health Insurance, and Market Failure in the Medical Economy," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(2), pages 629-675, June.
    6. Andrew Muller, R. & Mestelman, Stuart & Spraggon, John & Godby, Rob, 2002. "Can Double Auctions Control Monopoly and Monopsony Power in Emissions Trading Markets?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 70-92, July.
    7. Eckel, Catherine & Lutz, Nancy, 2003. "Introduction: What Role Can Experiments Play in Research on Regulation?," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 103-107, March.
    8. Jeffrey S. Banks & John O. Ledyard & David P. Porter, 1989. "Allocating Uncertain and Unresponsive Resources: An Experimental Approach," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 20(1), pages 1-25, Spring.
    9. Gruber, Jonathan, 1994. "The Incidence of Mandated Maternity Benefits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 622-641, June.
    10. Jonathan Gruber, 2002. "Taxes and Health Insurance," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 16, pages 37-66 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Bull, Clive & Schotter, Andrew & Weigelt, Keith, 1987. "Tournaments and Piece Rates: An Experimental Study," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(1), pages 1-33, February.
    12. Summers, Lawrence H, 1989. "Some Simple Economics of Mandated Benefits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 177-183, May.
    13. Norman K. Thurston, 1997. "Labor Market Effects of Hawaii'S Mandatory Employer-Provided Health Insurance," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 51(1), pages 117-135, October.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor


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