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May Issue Versus Shall Issue: Explaining The Pattern Of Concealed-Carry Handgun Laws, 1960-2001

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Listed:
  • RICHARD S. GROSSMAN
  • STEPHEN A. LEE

Abstract

"We analyze the timing and pattern of adoption of "shall issue" concealed-carry handgun laws. "Shall issue" laws require the authorities to issue permits to qualified applicants; "may issue" laws give the authorities more latitude to reject applications. We find three factors influence the shift from "may issue" to "shall issue." First, more urban states are less likely to shift to "shall issue," although the size of this effect is quantitatively small. Second, the switch is influenced by the decisions taken by neighboring states. Third, we find evidence that increases in the crime rate accelerated the switch to "shall issue.""("JEL "K40) Copyright (c) 2008 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard S. Grossman & Stephen A. Lee, 2008. "May Issue Versus Shall Issue: Explaining The Pattern Of Concealed-Carry Handgun Laws, 1960-2001," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(2), pages 198-206, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:26:y:2008:i:2:p:198-206
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ludwig, Jens, 1998. "Concealed-gun-carrying laws and violent crime: evidence from state panel data," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 239-254, September.
    2. Lott, John R, Jr, 1998. "The Concealed-Handgun Debate," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 221-243, January.
    3. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-679, June.
    4. Jens Otto Ludwig, 1998. "Concealed-Gun-Carrying Laws and Violent Crime: Evidence from State Panel Data," JCPR Working Papers 31, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    5. Lott, John R, Jr & Mustard, David B, 1997. "Crime, Deterrence, and Right-to-Carry Concealed Handguns," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(1), pages 1-68, January.
    6. Black, Dan A & Nagin, Daniel S, 1998. "Do Right-to-Carry Laws Deter Violent Crime?," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 209-219, January.
    7. Bronars, Stephen G & Lott, John R, Jr, 1998. "Criminal Deterrence, Geographic Spillovers, and the Right to Carry Concealed Handguns," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 475-479, May.
    8. Bartley, William Alan & Cohen, Mark A, 1998. "The Effect of Concealed Weapons Laws: An Extreme Bound Analysis," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(2), pages 258-265, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Geddes, R. Richard & Wagner, Benjamin L., 2013. "Why do U.S. states adopt public–private partnership enabling legislation?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 30-41.
    2. Angela K. Dills & Jeffrey A. Miron & Garrett Summers, 2010. "What Do Economists Know about Crime?," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Crime: Lessons for and from Latin America, pages 269-302 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. David Fortunato, 2015. "Can Easing Concealed Carry Deter Crime?," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1071-1085, December.
    4. Linda S. Ghent & Alan P. Grant, 2015. "Concealed Carry in the Show-Me State: Do Voters in Favor of Right-to-Carry Legislation End Up Packing Heat?," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 96(1), pages 191-201, March.
    5. Anderson, D. Mark & Sabia, Joseph J., 2016. "Child Access Prevention Laws, Youth Gun Carrying, and School Shootings," IZA Discussion Papers 9830, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Barati, Mehdi, 2016. "New evidence on the impact of concealed carry weapon laws on crime," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 76-83.
    7. Depew, Briggs & Swensen, Isaac D., 2016. "The Decision to Carry: The Effect of Crime on Concealed-Carry Applications," IZA Discussion Papers 10236, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • K40 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - General

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