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Structural Changes and Regional Income Inequality in Indonesia: A Bidimensional Decomposition Analysis

Author

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  • Takahiro Akita
  • Puji Agus Kurniawan
  • Sachiko Miyata

Abstract

This paper analyzes the changes in determinants of inter-provincial income inequality in Indonesia from 1983 to 2004 associated with structural changes using the bi-dimensional decomposition method of a population-weighted coefficient of variation. The method unifies two inequality decompositions by regional groups and GRP components (industrial sectors) and thus enables us to assess the contributions of GRP components to within-region and between-region inequalities, as well as to overall inequality. As the share of mining has decreased, the spatial distribution of manufacturing has played a more important role in the inequality of Sumatra and Kalimantan, while the primacy of Jakarta, with strong urbanization economies, facilitated by globalization and trade and financial liberalization, has determined much of Java-Bali's inequality and, therefore, overall inequality in Indonesia.
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Suggested Citation

  • Takahiro Akita & Puji Agus Kurniawan & Sachiko Miyata, 2011. "Structural Changes and Regional Income Inequality in Indonesia: A Bidimensional Decomposition Analysis," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 25(1), pages 55-77, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:asiaec:v:25:y:2011:i:1:p:55-77
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shorrocks, A F, 1980. "The Class of Additively Decomposable Inequality Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(3), pages 613-625, April.
    2. Hal Hill & Budy Resosudarmo & Yogi Vidyattama, 2008. "Indonesia'S Changing Economic Geography," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 407-435.
    3. Sergio J. Rey & Mark V. Janikas, 2005. "Regional convergence, inequality, and space," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(2), pages 155-176, April.
    4. Stephane Mussard, 2004. "The bidimensional decomposition of the Gini ratio. A case study: Italy," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(8), pages 503-505.
    5. Takahiro Akita, 2002. "Regional Income Inequality In Indonesia And The Initial Impact Of The Economic Crisis," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(2), pages 201-222.
    6. Jorge Garcia Garcia & Lana Soelistianingsih, 1998. "Why Do Differences in Provincial Incomes Persist in Indonesia?," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 95-120.
    7. Shorrocks, A F, 1982. "Inequality Decomposition by Factor Components," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(1), pages 193-211, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gluschenko, Konstantin, 2015. "‘Williamson’s Fallacy’ in Estimation of Inter-Regional Inequality," MPRA Paper 71075, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 03 May 2016.
    2. Takahiro Akita & Mark Saliganan Pagulayan, 2014. "Structural Changes And Interregional Income Inequality In The Philippines, 1975–2009," Review of Urban & Regional Development Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(2), pages 135-154, July.
    3. Andy Sumner & Peter Edward, 2013. "From Low Income, High Poverty to High-Income, No Poverty? An Optimistic View of the Long-Run Evolution of Poverty in Indonesia By International Poverty Lines, 1984–2030," Working Papers in Economics and Development Studies (WoPEDS) 201310, Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University, revised Jun 2013.
    4. Aekapol Chongvilaivan & Jungsuk Kim, 2016. "Individual Income Inequality and Its Drivers in Indonesia: A Theil Decomposition Reassessment," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(1), pages 79-98, March.
    5. H. Lehmann & M. G. Silvagni, 2013. "Is There Convergence of Russia’s Regions? Exploring the Empirical Evidence: 1995 – 2010," Working Papers wp901, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    6. Ivan Gonzalez & Budy P Resosudarmo, 2016. "A sectoral growth-income inequality nexus in Indonesia," Departmental Working Papers 2016-15, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    7. Hal Hill & Yogi Vidyattama, 2016. "Regional Development Dynamics In Indonesia Before And After The ‘Big Bang’ Decentralization," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(02), pages 1-26, June.
    8. Mitsuhiro Hayashi & Mitsuhiko Kataoka & Takahiro Akita, 2012. "Spatial Dimensions of Expenditure Inequality and the Role of Education in Indonesia: An Analysis of the 2008-2010 Susenas Panel," Working Papers EMS_2012_21, Research Institute, International University of Japan.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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