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Student debt levels and income of University of Latvia graduates: Prospects for income-contingent loan repayment by the field of studies and gender

Author

Listed:
  • Ali Ait Si Mhamed

    () (Department of Adolescent Education, Canisius College)

  • Rita Kaša

    () (Stockholm School of Economics in Riga)

  • Zane Cunska

    () (Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies (BICEPS))

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between student debt and income by gender and field of study among University of Latvia graduates of 2009. Data analysis in the paper is also framed by suggestions for an income-contingent student loan scheme in Latvia, modeled after the Australian example of the Higher Education Contribution Scheme. This research models a possible student loan payment pattern in Latvia under an income-contingent student loan plan. Data analysis shows that in the current mortgage-type student loan system, graduates of both genders in all fields of study and income groups have similar student debt levels, on average. At the same time, the largest portion of student debt is held by graduates in lower income groups. In the context of an income-contingent student loan payment scheme, analysis reveals that women and graduates in the field of humanities, pedagogy and psychology would be likely to belong to the low payment group. Consistent with findings in other studies, this research finds that female higher education graduates have lower income than men, on average, while graduates in the field of economics and business management tend to have higher income than graduates in other fields of study.

Suggested Citation

  • Ali Ait Si Mhamed & Rita Kaša & Zane Cunska, 2012. "Student debt levels and income of University of Latvia graduates: Prospects for income-contingent loan repayment by the field of studies and gender," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 12(2), pages 73-88, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bic:journl:v:12:y:2012:i:2:p:73-88
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chapman, Bruce & Lounkaew, Kiatanantha & Polsiri, Piruna & Sarachitti, Rangsit & Sitthipongpanich, Thitima, 2010. "Thailand's Student Loans Fund: Interest rate subsidies and repayment burdens," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 685-694, October.
    2. Ross Finnie & Ted Wannell, 2004. "Evolution of the gender earnings gap among Canadian university graduates," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(17), pages 1967-1978.
    3. repec:lan:wpaper:2436 is not listed on IDEAS
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    5. Kelly, Elish & O'Connell, Philip J. & Smyth, Emer, 2010. "The economic returns to field of study and competencies among higher education graduates in Ireland," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 650-657.
    6. Minicozzi, Alexandra, 2005. "The short term effect of educational debt on job decisions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 417-430, August.
    7. repec:lan:wpaper:2434 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Migali, Giuseppe, 2012. "Funding higher education and wage uncertainty: Income contingent loan versus mortgage loan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 871-889.
    9. Barr, Nicholas, 2001. "The Welfare State as Piggy Bank: Information, Risk, Uncertainty, and the Role of the State," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199246595.
    10. Finnie, Ross & Wannell, Ted, 2004. "The Evolution of the Gender Earnings Gap Amongst Canadian University Graduates," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2004235e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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