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Studying Discrimination: Fundamental Challenges and Recent Progress

Author

Listed:
  • Kerwin Kofi Charles

    (The Harris School, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637
    NBER, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138)

  • Jonathan Guryan

    (NBER, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
    Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208)

Abstract

We discuss research on discrimination against blacks and other racial minorities in labor market outcomes, highlighting fundamental challenges faced by empirical work in this area. Specifically, for work devoted to measuring whether and how much discrimination exists, we discuss how the absence of relevant data, the potential noncomparability of blacks and whites, and various conceptual concerns peculiar to race may frustrate or render impossible the application of empirical methods used in other areas of study. For work seeking to arbitrate empirically between the two main alternative theoretical explanations for such discrimination as it exists, we distinguish between indirect analyses, which do not directly study the variation in prejudice or the variation in information, the mechanisms at the heart of the two types of models we review, and direct analyses, which are more recent and much less common. We highlight problems with both approaches. Throughout, we discuss recent work, which, the various challenges notwithstanding, permits tentative conclusions about discrimination. We conclude by pointing to areas that might be fruitful avenues for future investigation.

Suggested Citation

  • Kerwin Kofi Charles & Jonathan Guryan, 2011. "Studying Discrimination: Fundamental Challenges and Recent Progress," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 3(1), pages 479-511, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:anr:reveco:v:3:y:2011:p:479-511
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    File URL: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.economics.102308.124448
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James J. Heckman & Jora Stixrud & Sergio Urzua, 2006. "The Effects of Cognitive and Noncognitive Abilities on Labor Market Outcomes and Social Behavior," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(3), pages 411-482, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    statistical discrimination; taste-based discrimination; empirical tests;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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