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Estimating Productivity Changes With Flexible Coeficients

  • Dorfman, Jeffrey H.
  • Foster, Kenneth A.

Technical progress in U.S. agriculture is evaluated using a new measure of productivity growth, flexible technical change. This measure allows for nonconstant returns to scale, market structures other than perfect competition, and time-varying coefficients. An integral part of the procedure is the estimation of the production function by Flexible Least Squares. Flexible technical change results are compared with two traditional measures of productivity growth and found to be more stable and more precise in a statistical sense. The results suggest that previous studies which employed total factor productivity measures may have overstated the impact of technology in agriculture.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/32615
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Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Western Journal of Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 16 (1991)
Issue (Month): 02 (December)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:wjagec:32615
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://waeaonline.org/

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  1. Tesfatsion, Leigh & Veitch, John M., 1990. "U.S. money demand instability A flexible least squares approach," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 151-173, February.
  2. Baltagi, Badi H & Griffin, James M, 1988. "A General Index of Technical Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(1), pages 20-41, February.
  3. Berndt, Ernst R. & Fuss, Melvyn A., 1986. "Productivity measurement with adjustments for variations in capacity utilization and other forms of temporary equilibrium," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1-2), pages 7-29.
  4. Hulten, Charles R., 1986. "Productivity change, capacity utilization, and the sources of efficiency growth," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1-2), pages 31-50.
  5. Kalaba, Robert E. & Tesfatsion, Leigh S., 1989. "Time-Varying Linear Regression Via Flexible Least Squares," Staff General Research Papers 11196, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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