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Employer Size, Human Capital, And Rural Wages: Implications For Southern Rural Development

Author

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  • Kraybill, David S.
  • Yoder, Michael J.
  • McNamara, Kevin T.

Abstract

A recent trend in rural development policy emphasizes small business development in place of industrial recruitment. To analyze some of the likely effects of expanding the proportion of small firms in local economies, an empirical wage rate model incorporating employer size was developed, and parameters were estimated using household date from rural Putnam County, Georgia. The estimates indicated that large employers offered higher wages than small employers and that the wage premium they offered was greater for blacks than for whites. These results support Thomas Till's argument that southern rural counties with relatively large black populations should not abandon efforts to attract large employers. Other factors associated with higher wages included level of education, previous labor force experience, and employment in certain occupations and industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Kraybill, David S. & Yoder, Michael J. & McNamara, Kevin T., 1991. "Employer Size, Human Capital, And Rural Wages: Implications For Southern Rural Development," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 23(02), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:sojoae:30045
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/30045
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Idson, Todd L & Feaster, Daniel J, 1990. "A Selectivity Model of Employer-Size Wage Differentials," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages 99-122, January.
    2. Barron, John M & Black, Dan A & Loewenstein, Mark A, 1987. "Employer Size: The Implications for Search, Training, Capital Investment, Starting Wages, and Wage Growth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(1), pages 76-89, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kelly D. Edmiston, 2007. "The role of small and large businesses in economic development," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 73-97.
    2. Kelly Edmiston, 2004. "The role of small business in economic development," Community Affairs Research Working Paper 2005-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

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