IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/reapec/50280.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Insider Power, Outsider Ineffectiveness and Product Market Competition: Evidence from Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Dobbie, Michael

Abstract

Insider-outsider theories have been advanced to explain a range of phenomena, principally the persistence of unemployment. This paper uses data from the Australian Workplace Industrial Relations Survey 1995, and regional labour force survey data, to test this model. The paper also examines how the extent of product market competition faced by a firm influences the ability of insiders to ignore outsiders in wage setting. The paper finds provisional support for the insider-outsider distinction, and for the idea that insider power is enhanced when product market competition is weak.

Suggested Citation

  • Dobbie, Michael, 2006. "Insider Power, Outsider Ineffectiveness and Product Market Competition: Evidence from Australia," Review of Applied Economics, Lincoln University, Department of Financial and Business Systems, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-19.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:reapec:50280
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/50280/files/3-Michael%20Dobbie.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Olivier J. Blanchard & Lawrence H. Summers, 1986. "Hysteresis and the European Unemployment Problem," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1986, Volume 1, pages 15-90 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Groenewold, Nicolaas & Taylor, Leanne, 1992. "Insider Power as a," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 68(200), pages 57-64, March.
    3. Nickell, S & Vainiomaki, J & Wadhwani, S, 1994. "Wages and Product Market Power," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 61(244), pages 457-473, November.
    4. Gregory, R G, 1986. "Wages Policy and Unemployment in Australia," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 53(210(S)), pages 53-74, Supplemen.
    5. Wooden, Mark & Bora, Bijit, 1999. "Workplace Characteristics and Their Effects on Wages: Australian Evidence," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(3), pages 276-289, September.
    6. Blanchard, Olivier J. & Summers, Lawrence H., 1987. "Hysteresis in unemployment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(1-2), pages 288-295.
    7. Nickell, Stephen & Nicolitsas, D., 1994. "Wages," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51644, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Paul Flatau & Philip E. T. Lewis & Allison Rushton, 1991. "The Macroeconomic Consequences of Long-Term Unemployment," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 24(4), pages 48-56.
    9. Assar Lindbeck & Dennis J. Snower, 2001. "Insiders versus Outsiders," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(1), pages 165-188, Winter.
    10. Roed, Knut, 1997. " Hysteresis in Unemployment," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(4), pages 389-418, December.
    11. Kennedy, Steven & Borland, Jeff, 2000. "A Wage Curve for Australia?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(4), pages 774-803, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demand and Price Analysis;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:reapec:50280. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aelinnz.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.