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Financial Sector Reforms and Currency Crisis: The Indonesian Experience

  • Shakur, Shamim
  • Obben, James
  • Nugroho, Agus Eko

The theory of exchange rate determination clearly links a depreciating currency to a deteriorating trade balance, interest differential and related economic fundamentals. Empirical testing carried out routinely confirms these relationships in “normal†times as currencies constantly align themselves to find their places in the global marketplace. When depreciation reaches crisis proportions, they are not always caused by a proportional deterioration in economic fundamentals. Random activities like speculative attacks are prompted by perceived problems in the banking sector as well as the contagion effect, leading to a currency crisis. Using pre crisis data and focusing on the Indonesian rupiah, this view is confirmed in the research.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/50271
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Article provided by Review of Applied Economics in its journal Review of Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 1 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:reapec:50271
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.lincoln.ac.nz/story11874.html

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  1. Miller, Victoria, 2000. "Central bank reactions to banking crises in fixed exchange rate regimes," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 451-472, December.
  2. Giancarlo Corsetti & Paolo Pesenti & Nouriel Roubini, 1998. "What Caused the Asian Currency and Financial Crisis? Part I: A Macroeconomic Overview," NBER Working Papers 6833, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. David Cole & Betty Slade, 1998. "Why Has Indonesia's Financial Crisis Been so Bad?," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 61-66.
  4. Jeffrey Sachs & Aaron Tornell & Andres Velasco, 1996. "The Mexican Peso Crisis: Sudden Death or Death Foretold?," NBER Working Papers 5563, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Carmen M. Reinhart & Graciela L. Kaminsky, 1999. "The Twin Crises: The Causes of Banking and Balance-of-Payments Problems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 473-500, June.
  6. Giancarlo Corsetti & Paolo Pesenti & Nouriel Roubini, 1998. "What Caused the Asian Currency and Financial Crisis? Part II: The Policy Debate," NBER Working Papers 6834, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Ronald I. McKinnon & Huw Pill, 1996. "Credible Liberalizations and International Capital Flows: The "Overborrowing Syndrome"," NBER Chapters, in: Financial Deregulation and Integration in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 5, pages 7-50 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Rose, Andrew K., 1996. "Currency crashes in emerging markets: An empirical treatment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-4), pages 351-366, November.
  9. Saxena, Sweta Chaman, 2002. "Exchange rate dynamics in Indonesia: 1980-1998," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 545-563.
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