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The Willingness to Spend on Healthcare: Evidence from Singapore

  • Gan, Lydia L.
  • Frederick, James R.
Registered author(s):

    For the past few decades, the household healthcare expenditures have experienced a phenomenal growth in Singapore. This paper seeks to identify the underlying socio-economic factors that contribute towards this phenomenon by employing time series data to examine the household willingness to spend on healthcare from 1970 to 2006. The results from our log-linear regression show that the willingness to spend on healthcare is positively related to the proportion of Singapore's population who are elderly, the literacy rate, the ratio of price of other goods and services to the price of healthcare, and the establishment of Singapore's mandatory health savings plan, Medisave. In terms of their effects on the growth of Singapore's willingness to spend on healthcare, the most important factors are the ageing of the population and the increase in the literacy rate.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/143266
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    Article provided by Review of Applied Economics in its journal Review of Applied Economics.

    Volume (Year): 06 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1-2 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:reapec:143266
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.lincoln.ac.nz/story11874.html

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    1. David M. Cutler & Ellen Meara, 1999. "The Concentration of Medical Spending: An Update," NBER Working Papers 7279, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Randall P. Ellis & Germano M. Mwabu, 1991. "The Demand for Outpatient Medical Care in Rural Kenya," Papers 0006, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
    3. David M. Cutler & Ellen Meara, 1998. "The Medical Costs of the Young and Old: A Forty-Year Perspective," NBER Chapters, in: Frontiers in the Economics of Aging, pages 215-246 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Akin, John S, et al, 1986. "The Demand for Primary Health Care Services in the Bicol Region of the Philippines," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(4), pages 755-82, July.
    5. Deb, Partha & Trivedi, Pravin K., 2002. "The structure of demand for health care: latent class versus two-part models," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 601-625, July.
    6. Chernichovsky, Dov & Meesook, Oey Astra, 1986. "Utilization of health services in Indonesia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 611-620, January.
    7. Diane Dawson & Rowena Jacobs & Stephen Martin & Peter Smith, 2006. "The impact of patient choice and waiting time on the demand for health care: results from the London Patient Choice project," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(12), pages 1363-1370.
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