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Internalizing Externalities Through Private Zoning: The Case of Walt Disney Company's Celebration, Florida

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  • Stringham, Edward P.
  • Miller, Jennifer K.
  • Clark, Jeff Ray

Abstract

Do zoning rules need to come from government? This article highlights the economic features of one of the largest privately-planned towns: Celebration, Florida. The 10,000-resident town includes numerous privately-provided public goods as well as rules that reduce negative externalities within the community. These features are designed to internalize exter-nalities and maximize the value of the community to customers. We discuss how private planners, in contrast to government zoning boards, have an incentive to figure out which community features consumers value. Using this master-planned community as an example of a successful corporate venture, we show that the private sector can successfully provide zoning on a citywide scale.

Suggested Citation

  • Stringham, Edward P. & Miller, Jennifer K. & Clark, Jeff Ray, 2010. "Internalizing Externalities Through Private Zoning: The Case of Walt Disney Company's Celebration, Florida," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 40(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:132444
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416-416.
    2. Siegan, Bernard H, 1970. "Non-zoning in Houston," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(1), pages 71-147, April.
    3. Edward L. Glaeser & Joseph Gyourko & Raven E. Saks, 2005. "Why Have Housing Prices Gone Up?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 329-333, May.
    4. Daniel P. McMillen & John F. McDonald, 2002. "Land Values In A Newly Zoned City," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(1), pages 62-72, February.
    5. Edward Stringham, 2006. "Overlapping Jurisdictions, Proprietary Communities, and Competition in the Realm of Law," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 162(3), pages 516-534, September.
    6. Whitener, Leslie A. & McGranahan, David A., 2003. "Rural America Opportunities and Challenges," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, February.
    7. John M. Quigley & Steven Raphael, 2005. "Regulation and the High Cost of Housing in California," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 323-328, May.
    8. Caplan, Bryan, 2001. "Standing Tiebout on His Head: Tax Capitalization and the Monopoly Power of Local Governments," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 108(1-2), pages 101-122, July.
    9. Richard K. Green & Stephen Malpezzi & Stephen K. Mayo, 2005. "Metropolitan-Specific Estimates of the Price Elasticity of Supply of Housing, and Their Sources," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 334-339, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Edward Stringham, 2014. "Extending the Analysis of Spontaneous Market Order to Governance," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 42(2), pages 171-180, June.
    2. Martín Krause, 2015. "Buoys and Beacons in Economics," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 30(Spring 20), pages 45-59.

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