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Assessing the Growth of the New Economy across Canadian Cities and Regions: 1990-2000

Author

Listed:
  • Beckstead, Desmond
  • Brown, Mark
  • Gellatly, Guy
  • Seaborn, Catherine

Abstract

Economic analysts have expressed significant interest in the transition of the industrial base towards knowledge-intensive production. A central aspect of this transition is the growth and development of industries that provide the technological and scientific foundations for what is often termed the New Economy. This empirical study develops a geographic profile of New Economy industries in Canada across the urban/rural hierarchy and in different metropolitan areas between 1990 and 2000. The study also investigates whether measures of agglomeration economies are correlated with the increased incidence of New Economy industries across different locations over the study period. The study shows that the employment growth in New Economy industries through the 1990s has been primarily an urban phenomenon and that agglomeration economies have played an increasingly important role in the formation of these industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Beckstead, Desmond & Brown, Mark & Gellatly, Guy & Seaborn, Catherine, 2004. "Assessing the Growth of the New Economy across Canadian Cities and Regions: 1990-2000," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 34(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:132288
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gilles Duranton & Diego Puga, 2001. "Nursery Cities: Urban Diversity, Process Innovation, and the Life Cycle of Products," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1454-1477, December.
    2. Oerlemans, L.A.G. & Meeus, M.T.H. & Boekema, F.W.M., 2001. "Firm clustering and innovation," Other publications TiSEM c4398688-1710-449a-83e7-e, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    3. Beckstead, Desmond & Brown, W. Mark & Gellatly, Guy & Seaborn, Catherine, 2003. "A Decade of Growth: The Emerging Geography of New Economy Industries in the 1990s," The Canadian Economy in Transition 2003003e, Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis Division.
    4. Ellison, Glenn & Glaeser, Edward L, 1997. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(5), pages 889-927, October.
    5. Maryann Feldman, 1999. "The New Economics Of Innovation, Spillovers And Agglomeration: Areview Of Empirical Studies," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1-2), pages 5-25.
    6. Dirk Pilat & Franck Lee & Bart van Ark, 2003. "Production and Use of ICT: A Sectoral Perspective on Productivity Growth in the OECD Area," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2002(2), pages 47-78.
    7. Beckstead, Desmond & Gellatly, Guy, 2003. "The Growth and Development of New Economy Industries," The Canadian Economy in Transition 2003002e, Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis Division.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ian Keay, 2008. "Resource Intensive Production and Aggregate Economic Performance," Working Papers 1176, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

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