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Incorporating Spatial Complexity into Economic Models of Land Markets and Land Use Change

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  • Chen, Yong
  • Irwin, Elena G.
  • Jayaprakash, Ciriyam

Abstract

Recent work in regional science, geography, and urban economics has advanced spatial modeling of land markets and land use by incorporating greater spatial complexity, including multiple sources of spatial heterogeneity, multiple spatial scales, and spatial dynamics. Doing so has required a move away from relying solely on analytical models to partial or full reliance on computational methods that can account for these added features of spatial complexity. In the first part of the paper, we review economic models of urban land development that have incorporated greater spatial complexity, focusing on spatial simulation models with spatial endogenous feedbacks and multiple sources of spatial heterogeneity. The second part of the paper presents a spatial simulation model of exurban land development using an auction model to represent household bidding that extends the traditional Capozza and Helsley (1990) model of urban growth to account for spatial dynamics in the form of local land use spillovers and spatially heterogeneous land characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Yong & Irwin, Elena G. & Jayaprakash, Ciriyam, 2011. "Incorporating Spatial Complexity into Economic Models of Land Markets and Land Use Change," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 40(3), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:120644
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lynch, Lori & Geoghegan, Jacqueline, 2011. "FOREWORD: The Economics of Land Use Change: Advancing the Frontiers," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 40(3), December.
    2. Magliocca, Nicholas & McConnell, Virginia & Walls, Margaret & Safirova, Elena, 2012. "Zoning on the urban fringe: Results from a new approach to modeling land and housing markets," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 198-210.
    3. Khalid Haniza, 2015. "Spatial heterogeneity and spatial bias analyses in hedonic price models: some practical considerations," Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series, De Gruyter Open, vol. 28(28), pages 113-128, June.
    4. Rémi Lemoy & Charles Raux & Pablo Jensen, 2016. "Exploring the polycentric city with multi-worker households: an agent-based microeconomic model," Post-Print hal-00602087, HAL.

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