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Spatial Analysis of Rural Economic Development Using a Locally Weighted Regression Model

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  • Cho, Seong-Hoon
  • Kim, Seung Gyu
  • Clark, Christopher D.
  • Park, William M.

Abstract

This study uses locally weighted regression to identify county-level characteristics that serve as drivers of creative employment throughout the southern United States. We found that higher per capita income, greater infrastructure investments, and the rural nature of a county tended to promote creative employment density, while higher scores on a natural amenity index had the opposite effect. We were also able to identify and map clusters of rural counties where the marginal effects of these variables on creative employment density were greatest. These findings should help rural communities to promote creative employment growth as a means of furthering rural economic development.

Suggested Citation

  • Cho, Seong-Hoon & Kim, Seung Gyu & Clark, Christopher D. & Park, William M., 2007. "Spatial Analysis of Rural Economic Development Using a Locally Weighted Regression Model," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 36(1), April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:10163
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Steven C. Deller & Tsung-Hsiu (Sue) Tsai & David W. Marcouiller & Donald B.K. English, 2001. "The Role of Amenities and Quality of Life In Rural Economic Growth," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(2), pages 352-365.
    2. Marlon G. Boarnet & Saksith Chalermpong & Elizabeth Geho, 2005. "Specification issues in models of population and employment growth," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 84(1), pages 21-46, March.
    3. Tzu-Ling Huang & Peter F. Orazem & Darin Wohlgemuth, 2002. "Rural Population Growth, 1950–1990: The Roles of Human Capital, Industry Structure, and Government Policy," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(3), pages 615-627.
    4. John I. Carruthers & Alexander C. Vias, 2005. "Urban, Suburban, and Exurban Sprawl in the Rocky Mountain West: Evidence from Regional Adjustment Models," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 21-48.
    5. Kilkenny, Maureen, 1993. "Rural vs. Urban Effects of Terminating Farm Subsidies," Staff General Research Papers Archive 11121, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Byrne, John & Shen, Bo & Wallace, William, 1998. "The economics of sustainable energy for rural development: A study of renewable energy in rural China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 45-54, January.
    7. Whitener, Leslie A. & McGranahan, David A., 2003. "Rural America Opportunities and Challenges," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, February.
    8. Mitch Renkow, 2003. "Employment Growth, Worker Mobility, and Rural Economic Development," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(2), pages 503-513.
    9. McGranahan, David A., 1999. "Natural Amenities Drive Rural Population Change," Agricultural Economics Reports 33955, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    10. A S Fotheringham & M E Charlton & C Brunsdon, 1998. "Geographically Weighted Regression: A Natural Evolution of the Expansion Method for Spatial Data Analysis," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 30(11), pages 1905-1927, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Suhyun Jung & Seong-Hoon Cho & Roland K. Roberts, 2015. "The impact of government funding of poverty reduction programmes," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 94(3), pages 653-675, August.
    2. Lambert, D. M. & Clark, C. D. & Wilcox, M. D. & Park, W. M., 2007. "Do Migrating Seniors Affect Business Establishment and Job Growth? An Empirical Look at Southeastern Nonmetropolitan Counties, 2000-2004," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 37(2), pages 251-278.
    3. Cho, Seong-Hoon & Lambert, Dayton M. & Roberts, Roland K. & Kim, Seung Gyu, 2008. "Moderating Urban Sprawl through Land Value Taxation," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6150, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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