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Are Food Price Differences in EU Member States a Result of the Penn Effect?


  • Fousekis, Panos


Panel data from 14 EU member states and non parametric techniques are used in this paper to investigate the relationship between food prices and real per capita incomes. The empirical results suggest that the Penn Effect largely holds for Total Food prices but not for the prices of certain among the seven disaggregate food commodities considered. In particular, for Cereals, for Fats and Oils, and for Other food products poorer countries are likely to face prices no lower than those prevailing in richer ones

Suggested Citation

  • Fousekis, Panos, 2009. "Are Food Price Differences in EU Member States a Result of the Penn Effect?," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 10(2), June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aergaa:58057

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ronald MacDonald & Luca Ricci, 2001. "PPP and the Balassa Samuelson Effect: the Role of the Distribution Sector," CESifo Working Paper Series 442, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Quah, Danny, 1997. "Empirics for Growth and Distribution: Stratification, Polarization, and Convergence Clubs," CEPR Discussion Papers 1586, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Johnson, Paul A., 2000. "A nonparametric analysis of income convergence across the US states," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 219-223, November.
    4. Sen, Amartya, 1997. "On Economic Inequality," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198292975, June.
    5. Quah, Danny T, 1997. "Empirics for Growth and Distribution: Stratification, Polarization, and Convergence Clubs," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 27-59, March.
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    More about this item


    Food Prices; Living Standards; EU; Agricultural and Food Policy; Q11; C14;

    JEL classification:

    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices
    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General


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