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Retirement Security in an Aging Population

Author

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  • James M. Poterba

Abstract

Elderly individuals exhibit wide disparities in their sources of income. For those in the bottom half of the income distribution, Social Security is the most important source of support; program changes would directly affect their well-being. Income from private pensions, assets, and earnings are relatively more important for higher-income elderly individuals, who have more diverse income sources. The trend from private sector defined benefit to defined contribution pension plans has shifted responsibility for retirement security to individuals. A significant subset of the population is unlikely to be able to sustain their standard of living in retirement without higher pre-retirement saving.

Suggested Citation

  • James M. Poterba, 2014. "Retirement Security in an Aging Population," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 1-30, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:104:y:2014:i:5:p:1-30
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.104.5.1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Giesecke, Matthias & Yang, Guanzhong, 2016. "Are financial retirement incentives more effective if pension knowledge is high?," Ruhr Economic Papers 641, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    2. John Y. Campbell, 2016. "Restoring Rational Choice: The Challenge of Consumer Financial Regulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 1-30, May.
    3. Dolls, Mathias & Doerrenberg, Philipp & Peichl, Andreas & Stichnoth, Holger, 2016. "Do savings increase in response to salient information about retirement and expected pensions?," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-059, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    4. Andreas Irmen & Anastasia Litina, 2016. "Population Aging and Inventive Activity," CESifo Working Paper Series 5841, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Motavasseli, Ali, 2016. "Essays in environmental policy and household economics," Other publications TiSEM b32e287e-169b-4e89-9878-1, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    6. Brian K. Chen & Hawre Jalal & Hideki Hashimoto & Sze-Chuan Suen & Karen Eggleston & Michael Hurley & Lena Schoemaker & Jay Bhattacharya, 2016. "Forecasting Trends in Disability in a Super-Aging Society: Adapting the Future Elderly Model to Japan," NBER Working Papers 21870, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Giesecke, Matthias Nicolas & Yang, Guanzhong, 2016. "The Effect of Financial Incentives on Retirement Decision Making under Different Schemes of Information Provision: Experimental Evidence," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145548, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    8. Dan Goldhaber & Cyrus Grout, 2016. "Pension Choices and the Savings Patterns of Public School Teachers," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 11(4), pages 449-481, Fall.
    9. Dahlquist, Magnus & Setty, Ofer & Vestman, Roine, 2016. "On the Asset Allocation of a Default Pension Fund," CEPR Discussion Papers 11052, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Andersen, Torben M. & Bhattacharya, Joydeep, 2016. "Why mandate young borrowers to contribute to their retirement accounts?," ISU General Staff Papers 201609260700001016, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    11. David N. Weil, 2015. "Capital and Wealth in the Twenty-First Century," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(5), pages 34-37, May.
    12. J. Michael Collins & Carly Urban, 2016. "The Role Of Information On Retirement Planning: Evidence From A Field Study," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(4), pages 1860-1872, October.
    13. Hirazawa, Makoto & Yakita, Akira, 2017. "Labor supply of elderly people, fertility, and economic development," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 75-96.
    14. Raj Chetty, 2015. "Behavioral Economics and Public Policy: A Pragmatic Perspective," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(5), pages 1-33, May.
    15. repec:hrv:faseco:34330194 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Mathias Dolls & Philipp Dörrenberg & Andreas Peichl & Holger Stichnoth, 2018. "Do Retirement Savings Increase in Response to Information About Retirement and Expected Pensions?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6842, CESifo Group Munich.
    17. Federica Teppa & Susan Thorp & Hazel Bateman, 2015. "Family, friends and framing: A cross-country study of subjective survival expectations," DNB Working Papers 491, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    18. Hosseini, Roozbeh & Shourideh, Ali, 2016. "Retirement Financing: An Optimal Reform Approach," MPRA Paper 71613, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Jan 2016.
    19. Randle, Tony & Rudolph, Heinz P., 2014. "Pension risk and risk-based supervision in defined contribution pension funds," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6813, The World Bank.
    20. Teresa Ghilarducci & Michael Papadopoulos & Siavash Radpour, 2017. "Relative Wages in Aging America: The Baby Boomer Effect," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2017-03, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    21. John Ameriks & Andrew Caplin & Minjoon Lee & Matthew D. Shapiro & Christopher Tonetti, 2015. "The Wealth of Wealthholders," NBER Working Papers 20972, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Christopher R. Tamborini & Patrick Purcell, 2016. "Women’s Household Preparation for Retirement at Young and Mid-Adulthood: Differences by Children and Marital Status," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 226-241, June.
    23. repec:eee:jfinec:v:126:y:2017:i:3:p:689-712 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_661 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. Victor Stango & Joanne Yoong & Jonathan Zinman, 2017. "The Quest for Parsimony in Behavioral Economics: New Methods and Evidence on Three Fronts," NBER Working Papers 23057, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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