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Monetary Policy Regime Shifts and Inflation Persistence

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Author Info

  • Taeyoung Doh

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City)

  • Troy Davig

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City)

Abstract

around the Volcker disinflation. The subsequent decline in persistence is due to both a more aggressive monetary policy regime and less volatile shocks.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2009 Meeting Papers with number 182.

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Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:red:sed009:182

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Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Christian Zimmermann Economic Research Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis PO Box 442 St. Louis MO 63166-0442 USA
Fax: 1-314-444-8731
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Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/society.htm
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Cited by:
  1. Gonzalez-Astudillo, Manuel, 2013. "Monetary-Fiscal Policy Interactions: Interdependent Policy Rule Coefficients," MPRA Paper 50040, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Francesco Bianchi & Andrea Civelli, 2013. "Globalization and Inflation: Structural Evidence from a Time Varying VAR Approach," Working Papers 13-20, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  3. Conrad, Christian & Eife, Thomas A., 2012. "Explaining Inflation-Gap Persistence by a Time-Varying Taylor Rule," Working Papers 0521, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
  4. Fang Yao, 2011. "Monetary Policy, Trend Inflation and Inflation Persistence," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2011-008, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  5. Troy Davig & Eric M. Leeper, 2010. "Generalizing the Taylor Principle: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 618-24, March.
  6. Philip Liu & Haroon Mumtaz, 2011. "Evolving Macroeconomic Dynamics in a Small Open Economy: An Estimated Markov Switching DSGE Model for the UK," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(7), pages 1443-1474, October.
  7. Traum, Nora & Yang, Shu-Chun S., 2011. "Monetary and fiscal policy interactions in the post-war U.S," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 140-164, January.
  8. Gonzalez-Astudillo, Manuel, 2011. "Policy Rule Coefficients Driven by Latent Factors: Monetary and Fiscal Policy Interactions in an Endowment Economy," MPRA Paper 29976, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Troy Davig, Eric Leeper, 2009. "Reply To “Generalizing The Taylor Principle: A Comment”," Caepr Working Papers 2009-008, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
  10. Ana Beatriz Galvao & Massimiliano Marcellino, 2010. "Endogenous Monetary Policy Regimes and the Great Moderation," Economics Working Papers ECO2010/22, European University Institute.
  11. Davide Debortoli & Ricardo Nunes, 2011. "Monetary regime switches and unstable objectives," International Finance Discussion Papers 1036, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  12. Thanassis Kazanas & Apostolis Philippopoulos & Elias Tzavalis, 2011. "Monetary Policy Rules And Business Cycle Conditions," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 79(s2), pages 73-97, 09.

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