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Costly and discrete communication: An experimental investigation

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  • Duffy, Sean
  • Hartwig, Tyson
  • Smith, John

Abstract

Language is an imperfect and uneven means of communicating information about a complex and nuanced world. We run an experimental investigation of a setting in which the messages available to the sender imperfectly describe the state of the world, however the sender can improve communication, at a cost, by increasing the complexity or elaborateness of the message. As is standard in the communication literature, the sender learns the state of the world then sends a message to the receiver. The receiver observes the message and provides a best guess about the state. The incentives of the players are aligned in the sense that both sender and receiver are paid an amount which is increasing in the accuracy of the receiver's guess. As would be expected, we find that larger communication costs are associated with worse outcomes for both sender and receiver. Consistent with the communication literature, albeit in very different setting, we find that there is overcommunication. For the receiver, there is a positive relationship between the payoffs relative to the equilibrium predictions and communication costs. This relationship is negative for the senders. We also find that the response time of both the sender and receiver are positively related to their payoffs.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 24148.

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Date of creation: 29 Jul 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:24148

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Keywords: communication; cheap talk; overcommunication;

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Cited by:
  1. Hertel, Johanna & Smith, John, 2011. "Not so cheap talk: Costly and discrete communication," MPRA Paper 29148, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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