Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Network Structure and City Size

Contents:

Author Info

Abstract

Network structure varies across cities. This variation may yield important knowledge about how the internal structure of the city affects its performance. This paper systematically com- pares a set of surface transportation network structure variables (connectivity, hierarchy, circuity, treeness, entropy, accessibility) across the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. It finds most of these measures vary with city size. A set of scaling parameters are discovered to show how network size and structure vary with city size. These results suggest that larger cities are physically more inter-connected.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://nexus.umn.edu/Papers/NetworkStructureAndCitySize.pdf
File Function: First version, 2011
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group in its series Working Papers with number 000094.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in working paper
Handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:networkstructureandcitysize

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Dept. of Civil Engineering, 500 Pillsbury Drive SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
Phone: +01 (612) 625-6354
Fax: +01 (612) 626-7750
Web page: http://nexus.umn.edu
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Connectivity; Network Structure; Transportation Geography; Network Science; City Size; Scaling Rules;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Glaeser, E.L. & Ades, A.F., 1993. "Trade and Circuses: Explaining Urban Giants," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1646, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew G. Resseger, 2010. "The Complementarity Between Cities And Skills," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 221-244.
  3. Sybil Derrible & Christopher Kennedy, 2010. "Characterizing metro networks: state, form, and structure," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 275-297, March.
  4. Bettencourt, Luis M.A. & Lobo, Jose & Strumsky, Deborah, 2007. "Invention in the city: Increasing returns to patenting as a scaling function of metropolitan size," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 107-120, February.
  5. David Levinson & Arthur Huang, 2012. "A positive theory of network connectivity," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 39(2), pages 308-325, March.
  6. George J. Stigler, 1951. "The Division of Labor is Limited by the Extent of the Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59, pages 185.
  7. Daniel Graham & H. Kim, 2008. "An empirical analytical framework for agglomeration economies," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 267-289, June.
  8. Feng Xie & David Levinson, 2005. "Measuring the Structure of Road Networks," Working Papers 200702, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  9. Edward L. Glaeser & William R. Kerr, 2008. "Local Industrial Conditions and Entrepreneurship: How Much of the Spatial Distribution Can We Explain?," Harvard Business School Working Papers 09-055, Harvard Business School.
  10. Bin Jiang & Christophe Claramunt, 2004. "Topological analysis of urban street networks," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 31(1), pages 151-162, January.
  11. Melo, Patricia C. & Graham, Daniel J. & Noland, Robert B., 2009. "A meta-analysis of estimates of urban agglomeration economies," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 332-342, May.
  12. Roell, Ailsa, 1982. "Wasteful Commuting: Appendix," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(5), pages 1052-53, October.
  13. Derrible, Sybil & Kennedy, Christopher, 2010. "The complexity and robustness of metro networks," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 389(17), pages 3678-3691.
  14. Levinson, David & El-Geneidy, Ahmed, 2009. "The minimum circuity frontier and the journey to work," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 732-738, November.
  15. Graham, Daniel J., 2007. "Variable returns to agglomeration and the effect of road traffic congestion," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 103-120, July.
  16. Hamilton, Bruce W, 1982. "Wasteful Commuting," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(5), pages 1035-51, October.
  17. Pavithra Parthasarathi & David Levinson, 2010. "Network Structure and Metropolitan Mobility," Working Papers 000083, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  18. Samaniego, Horacio & Moses, Melanie E., 2008. "Cities as Organisms: Allometric Scaling of Urban Road Networks," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 1(1), pages 21-39.
  19. Daniel J. Graham, 2007. "Agglomeration, Productivity and Transport Investment," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, London School of Economics and University of Bath, vol. 41(3), pages 317-343, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:networkstructureandcitysize. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (David Levinson).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.