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The Employment Adjustment of Male Immigrants in England

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  • Stephen Wheatley Price

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Abstract

In this paper the employment performance of native and foreign born men in England is examined, using 1993-1994 data from the Quarterly Labour Force Survey of the United Kingdom. Chiswick's (1982) hypotheses of immigrant employment adjustment are investigated using logistic regression analysis. We show that there are interesting and important employment effects arising from immigrant characteristics. Recent white immigrants experience a transitory employment disadvantage. However non-white immigrants never attain employment equality with native born white men. Education, potential experience, family characteristics and country of birth are also found to be important determinants of employment.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Leicester in its series Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics with number 98/9.

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Handle: RePEc:lec:lpserc:98/9

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  1. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
  2. Stephen Nickell, 1979. "A Picture of Male Unemployment in Britain," Working Papers, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. 503, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. Wright, Robert E & Ermisch, John F, 1991. "Gender Discrimination in the British Labour Market: A Reassessment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(406), pages 508-22, May.
  4. Borjas, George J, 1985. "Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 463-89, October.
  5. Stephen Wheatley Price, . "The Unemployment Experience of Male Immigrants in England," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics, Department of Economics, University of Leicester 98/10, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  6. Michael Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 1998. "The earnings of male immigrants in England: evidence from the quarterly LFS," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(9), pages 1157-1168.
  7. Hatton, Timothy J. & Wheatley Price, Stephen, 1998. "Migration, Migrants and Policy in the United Kingdom," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 1960, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Chiswick, Barry R & Miller, Paul W, 1995. "The Endogeneity between Language and Earnings: International Analyses," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 246-88, April.
  9. Barry R. Chiswick & Yinon Cohen & Tzippi Zach, 1997. "The labor market status of immigrants: Effects of the unemployment rate at arrival and duration of residence," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 50(2), pages 289-303, January.
  10. George J. Borjas & Richard B. Freeman, 1992. "Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number borj92-1.
  11. George J. Borjas, 1992. "National Origin and the Skills of Immigrants in the Postwar Period," NBER Chapters, in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 17-48 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Hurst, Michael E. & Chiswick, Barry R., 2000. "The Employment, Unemployment and Unemployment Compensation Benefits of Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 129, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Borjas, George J, 1987. "Self-Selection and the Earnings of Immigrants," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 531-53, September.
  14. Dustmann, C, 1993. "Earnings Adjustment of Temporary Migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 153-68, May.
  15. Ghatak, Subrata & Levine, Paul & Price, Stephen Wheatley, 1996. " Migration Theories and Evidence: An Assessment," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(2), pages 159-98, June.
  16. Blackaby, David H, et al, 1997. "A Picture of Male and Female Unemployment among Britain's Ethnic Minorities," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 44(2), pages 182-97, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Adriano Paggiaro, 2013. "How do immigrants fare during the downturn? Evidence from matching comparable natives," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(8), pages 229-258, February.
  2. Rukhsana Kausar & Stephen Drinkwater, 2010. "A Comparison of Earnings and Occupational Attainment of Refugees and Asylum Seekers and Economic Immigrants in the UK," School of Economics Discussion Papers, School of Economics, University of Surrey 0810, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  3. Kahanec, Martin & Zaiceva, Anzelika & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2010. "Ethnic Minorities in the European Union: An Overview," IZA Discussion Papers 5397, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz & Thorsten Vogel, 2006. "Employment, Wages, and the Economic Cycle: Differences between Immigrants and Natives," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0609, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  5. Hamori, Szilvia, 2009. "Employment convergence of immigrants in the EU: Differences across genders, regions of origin and destination," HWWI Research Papers 3-20, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  6. Averett, Susan L. & Argys, Laura & Kohn, Jennifer L., 2012. "Immigration, Obesity and Labor Market Outcomes in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 6454, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Drinkwater, Stephen & Robinson, Catherine, 2011. "Welfare Participation by Immigrants in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 6144, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Mari Kangasniemi & Merja Kauhanen, 2013. "Characteristics and labour market performance of the new member state (NMS12) immigrants in Finland, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom," Norface Discussion Paper Series, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London 2013002, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  9. Weiping Kostenko & Mark Harris & Xueyan Zhao, 2012. "Occupational transition and country-of-origin effects in the early stage occupational assimilation of immigrants: some evidence from Australia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(31), pages 4019-4035, November.
  10. Silaghi, Monica Ioana & Ghatak, Subrata, 2011. "Why do not They Move from Rural to Urban Areas? Inter-Regional Migration in Romania," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(1), pages 143-158, March.
  11. Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Kahanec, Martin & Giulietti, Corrado & Guzi, Martin & Barrett, Alan & Maitre, Bertrand, 2012. "Report No. 43: Study on Active Inclusion of Migrants," IZA Research Reports 43, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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