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‘Atypical Work’ and Compensation

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  • Addison, John T.

    ()
    (University of South Carolina)

  • Surfield, Christopher J.

    ()
    (Saginaw Valley State University)

Abstract

Atypical work, or alternative work arrangements in U.S. parlance, has long been criticized for providing poorly-compensated employment. Although one group of atypical workers (contractors) seems to enjoy a wage premium, our cross-section results from the CPS and NLSY for the better-known category of temporary workers point to a negative wage differential of some 7-12 percent. It emerges that much of the latter disparity stems from unobserved worker heterogeneity (accounting for which supports a wage advantage for contracting work). Turning to fringes, the appearance in cross section of a potentially large deficit in atypical worker health benefits is again reduced after accounting for permanent unobserved individual heterogeneity. But on this occasion the reduction is very modest. Further, there is now some indication that the wage advantage of contract workers partly compensates for their reduced access to such benefits.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 1477.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2005
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Southern Economic Journal, 2007, 73(4), 1038–1065
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1477

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Keywords: alternative work arrangements; atypical/contingent work; employer-related health insurance; wage differentials;

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References

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  1. Chris Forde & Gary Slater, 2004. "Agency working in Britain: character, consequences and regulation," Working Papers 2004/4, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Business School, Economics Division.
  2. Marco Manacorda, 2004. "Can the Scala Mobile Explain the Fall and Rise of Earnings Inequality in Italy? A Semiparametric Analysis, 19771993," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(3), pages 585-614, July.
  3. Barry T. Hirsch & Edward J. Schumacher, 2004. "Match Bias in Wage Gap Estimates Due to Earnings Imputation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(3), pages 689-722, July.
  4. Susan N. Houseman & Anne E. Polivka, 1999. "The Implications of Flexible Staffing Arrangements for Job Stability," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 99-56, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
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  6. Addison, John T. & Surfield, Christopher J., 2004. "The Use of Alternative Work Arrangements by the Jobless: Evidence from the CAEAS/CPS," IZA Discussion Papers 1378, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Lewis M. Segal & Daniel G. Sullivan, 1997. "The Growth of Temporary Services Work," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 117-136, Spring.
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  9. David H. Autor, 2003. "Outsourcing at Will: The Contribution of Unjust Dismissal Doctrine to the Growth of Employment Outsourcing," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-42, January.
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  11. Carolyn J. Heinrich & Peter R. Mueser & Kenneth R. Troske, 2005. "Welfare to Temporary Work: Implications for Labor Market Outcomes," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 154-173, February.
  12. Susan N. Houseman & Arne L. Kalleberg & George A. Erickcek, . "The Role of Temporary Agency Employment in Tight Labor Markets," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles snhakge2003, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  13. David H. Autor, 2000. "Why Do Temporary Help Firms Provide Free General Skills Training?," NBER Working Papers 7637, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Abraham, Katharine G & Taylor, Susan K, 1996. "Firms' Use of Outside Contractors: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(3), pages 394-424, July.
  15. Susan N. Houseman & Arne L. Kalleberg & George A. Erickcek, 2003. "The role of temporary agency employment in tight labor markets," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(1), pages 105-127, October.
  16. Lewis M. Segal & Daniel G. Sullivan, 1998. "Wage differentials for temporary services work: evidence from administrative data," Working Paper Series WP-98-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  17. Blackburn, McKinley L., 2007. "Estimating wage differentials without logarithms," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 73-98, January.
  18. Farber, Henry S, 1999. "Alternative and Part-Time Employment Arrangements as a Response to Job Loss," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages S142-69, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Adelino Fortunato & Daniel Murta, 2005. "Horizontal Differentiation and the survival of Train and Coach modes in medium range passenger transport, a welfare analysis comprising economies of scope and scale," GEMF Working Papers 2005-15, GEMF - Faculdade de Economia, Universidade de Coimbra.
  2. Marloes de Graaf-Zijl, 2005. "The Attractiveness of Temporary Employment to Reduce Adjustment Costs," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-121/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  3. Tatiana Karabchuk, 2012. "Part-time and temporary workers in Russia: winners or losers?," Journal of Labour Market Research, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 23-39, March.
  4. Blandina Oliveira & Adelino Fortunato, 2005. "The Dynamics of the Growth of Firms: Evidence from the Services Sector," GEMF Working Papers 2005-04, GEMF - Faculdade de Economia, Universidade de Coimbra.
  5. Marloes de Graaf-Zijl, 2005. "Compensation of On-call and Fixed-term Employment: the Role of Uncertainty," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-120/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  6. Marloes de Graaf-Zijl, 2005. "The Anatomy of Job Satisfaction and the Role of Contingent Employment Contracts," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-119/3, Tinbergen Institute.

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