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The Aggregation Dilemma

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  • Ingmar Schumacher

Abstract

The results in this paper show that the level of aggregation used in a social welfare func- tion matters significantly for policy analysis. Using climate change as an example, it is shown that, under the mild and widely-accepted assumptions of asymmetric climate change impacts and declining marginal utility, an aggregation dilemma may arise that dwarfs most other policy-relevant aspects in the climate change cost-benefit analysis. Estimates based on the RICE-99 model (Nordhaus and Boyer 2000) suggest that aggregation leads to around 26% higher total world emissions than those from a regional model. The backstop energy use would be zero in the model which aggregates consumption in utility, while it would be 1.3% of Gross World Product in a regionally-disaggregated version. In general we observe that richer countries will be required to undertake stronger efforts toward climate policy based on the aggregated utility social welfare function and compared to both the aggregated utility function with Negishi weights and the aggregated consumption function. We propose criteria that may aid in deciding on the level of aggregation one might wish to choose de- pending on both positive and normative criteria. Though the policy recommendations from fully aggregated models like the DICE model are always used as a benchmark for policy making, the results here suggest that this should be done with the reservations raised by the Aggregation Dilemma in mind.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Research, Ipag Business School in its series Working Papers with number 2014-224.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: 10 Apr 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ipg:wpaper:2014-224

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Related research

Keywords: Aggregation Dilemma; social welfare function; Integrated Assessment Models; climate policy.;

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  1. Ray, D. & Vohra, R., 1996. "A Theory of Endogenous Coalition Structure," Papers 68, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
  2. Luca MARCHIORI & Jean-François MAYSTADT & Ingmar SCHUMACHER, 2011. "The Impact of Weather Anomalies on Migration in sub-Saharan Africa," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2011034, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  3. Popp, David, 2006. "ENTICE-BR: The effects of backstop technology R&D on climate policy models," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 188-222, March.
  4. Martin L. Weitzman, 2007. "A Review of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(3), pages 703-724, September.
  5. Ingmar Schumacher, 2013. "The endogenous formation of an environmental culture," CEEES Paper Series CE3S-04/13, European University at St. Petersburg, Department of Economics.
  6. Stephen C. Peck & Thomas J. Teisberg, 1999. "CO2 Emissions Control Agreements: Incentives for Regional Participation," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 367-390.
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