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Remittances and Labor Supply in Post-Conflict Tajikistan

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  • Patricia Justino

    ()
    (Institute of Development Studies)

  • Olga Shemyakina

    ()
    (Georgia Institute of Technology)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of remittances on the labor supply of men and women in post-conflict Tajikistan. We find that on average men and women from remittance-receiving households are less likely to participate in the labor market and supply fewer hours when they do. The negative effect of remittances on labor supply is smaller for women, which is an intriguing result as other studies on remittances and labor supply (primarily focused on Latin America) have shown that female labor supply is more responsive to remittances. The results are robust to using different measures of remittances and inclusion of variables measuring migration of household members. We estimate a joint effect of remittances and an individual’s residence in a conflict-affected area during the Tajik civil war. Remittances had a larger impact on the labor supply of men living in conflict-affected areas compared to men in less conflictaffected areas. The impact of remittances on the labor supply of women does not differ by their residence in both the more or less conflict affected area.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 83.

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Length: 45 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:83

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References

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  1. Tilman Bruck & Kati Schindler, 2009. "The Impact of Violent Conflicts on Households: What Do We Know and What Should We Know about War Widows?," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 289-309.
  2. Nidhiya Menon & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, 2010. "War and Women’s Work: Evidence from the Conflict in Nepal," Working Papers, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School 19, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
  3. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2006. "Migration, Remittances, and Male and Female Employment Patterns," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 222-226, May.
  4. Mathias Czaika & Krisztina Kis-Katos, 2007. "Civil Conflict and Displacement: Village-Level Determinants of Forced Migration in Aceh," HiCN Working Papers, Households in Conflict Network 32, Households in Conflict Network.
  5. Ana María Ibáñez L. & Manuel Fernández & Ximena Peña, 2011. "Adjusting the Labor Supply to Mitigate Violent Shocks: Evidence from Rural Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE 009246, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  6. Lori A. Beaman, 2012. "Social Networks and the Dynamics of Labour Market Outcomes: Evidence from Refugees Resettled in the U.S," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(1), pages 128-161.
  7. Azzarri, Carlo & Zezza, Alberto, 2011. "International migration and nutritional outcomes in Tajikistan," Food Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 54-70, February.
  8. Binzel, Christine & Assaad, Ragui, 2011. "Egyptian men working abroad: Labour supply responses by the women left behind," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 18(S1), pages S98-S114.
  9. Alexei Kireyev, 2006. "The Macroeconomics of Remittances," IMF Working Papers, International Monetary Fund 06/2, International Monetary Fund.
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Cited by:
  1. Patricia Justino & Ivan Cardona & Rebecca Mitchell & Catherine Müller, 2012. "Quantifying the Impact of Women’s Participation in Post-Conflict Economic Recovery," HiCN Working Papers, Households in Conflict Network 131, Households in Conflict Network.
  2. Köllner, Sebastian, 2013. "Remittances and educational attainment: Evidence from Tajikistan," Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Beiträge, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Lehrstuhl für Volkswirtschaftslehre, insbes. Wirtschaftsordnung und Sozialpolitik 124, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Lehrstuhl für Volkswirtschaftslehre, insbes. Wirtschaftsordnung und Sozialpolitik.
  3. Akramov, Kamiljon T. & Shreedhar, Ganga, 2012. "Economic development, external shocks, and food security in Tajikistan:," IFPRI discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 1163, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Jeffrey H. Cohen & Dilip Ratha, 2012. "Migration and Remittances during the Global Financial Crisis and Beyond," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13092, August.
  5. Yashodhan Ghorpade, 2012. "Coping Strategies in Natural Disasters and under Conflict: A Review of Household Responses and Notes for Public Policy," HiCN Working Papers, Households in Conflict Network 136, Households in Conflict Network.
  6. Patricia Justino & Marinella Leone & Paola Salardi, 2011. "Education and Conflict Recovery: The Case of Timor Leste," HiCN Working Papers, Households in Conflict Network 100, Households in Conflict Network.
  7. Piracha, Matloob & Randazzo, Teresa & Vadean, Florin, 2013. "Remittances and Occupational Outcomes of the Household Members Left-Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 7582, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Brück, Tilman & Esenaliev, Damir & Kroeger, Antje & Kudebayeva, Alma & Mirkasimov, Bakhrom & Steiner, Susan, 2012. "Household Survey Data for Research on Well-Being and Behavior in Central Asia," IZA Discussion Papers 7055, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Kröger, Antje & Meier, Kristina, 2011. "Employment and the Financial Crisis: Evidence from Tajikistan," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics 50, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.

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