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Migration, Remittances and Rural Employment Patterns: Evidence from China

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  • Sylvie Démurger

    ()
    (GATE Lyon Saint-Étienne - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - CNRS : UMR5824 - Université Lumière - Lyon II - École Normale Supérieure (ENS) - Lyon - PRES Université de Lyon)

  • Shi Li

    (School of Economics and Business Administration - Beijing Normal University / Beijing)

Abstract

This paper explores the rural labor market impact of migration in China using crosssectional data on rural households for the year 2007. A switching probit model is used to estimate the impact of belonging to a migrant-sending household on the individual occupational choice categorized in four binary decisions : farm work, wage work, self-employment and housework. The paper then goes on to estimate how the impact of migration differs across different types of migrant households identified along two additional lines : remittances and migration history. Results show that individual occupational choice in rural China is responsive to migration, at both the individual and the family levels, but the impacts differ : individual migration experience favors subsequent local off-farm work, whereas at the family level, migration drives the left-behinds to farming rather than to off-farm activities. Our results also point to the interplay of various channels through which migration influences rural employment patterns.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number halshs-00744438.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00744438

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Keywords: labor migration; labor supply; remittances; temporary migration; left-behind; China;

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