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Do Large Departments Make Academics More Productive? Agglomeration and Peer Effects in Research

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  • Clément Bosquet
  • Pierre-Philippe Combes

Abstract

We study the effect of a large set of department characteristics on individual publication records. We control for many individual time-varying characteristics, individual fixed-effects and reverse causality. Department characteristics have an explanatory power that can be as high as that of individual characteristics. The departments that generate most externalities are those where academics are homogeneous in terms of publication performance and have diverse research fields, and, to a lesser extent, large departments, with more women, older academics, star academics and foreign co-authors. Department specialisation in a field also favours publication in that field. More students per academic does not penalise publication. At the individual level, women and older academics publish less, while the average publication quality increases with average number of authors per paper, individual field diversity, number of published papers and foreign co-authors.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE in its series SERC Discussion Papers with number 0133.

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Date of creation: Apr 2013
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Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0133

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Web page: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/publications/default.asp

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Keywords: productivity determinants; economic geography; networks; economics of science; selection and endogeneity;

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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Department size and research productivity
    by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2013-04-29 13:55:00
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Cited by:
  1. Thomas Bolli & Jörg Schläpfer, 2013. "Job Mobility, Peer Effects, and Research Productivity in Economics," KOF Working papers 13-342, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  2. Clément Bosquet & Pierre-Philippe Combes & Cecilia Garcia-Peñalosa, 2013. "Gender and Competition: Evidence from Academic Promotions in France," Sciences Po Economics Discussion Papers 2013-17, Sciences Po Departement of Economics.
  3. Jochen Hartwig, 2013. "Structural change, aggregate demand and employment dynamics in the OECD, 1970-2010," KOF Working papers 13-343, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  4. Clément Bosquet & Pierre-Philippe Combes & Cecilia Garcia-Peñalosa, 2014. "Gender and Promotions: Evidence from Academic Economists in France," Sciences Po publications 29, Sciences Po.

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