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Trust among the Avatars: A Virtual World Experiment, with and without Textual and Visual Cues

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Abstract

We invited “residents” of a virtual world who vary in real-world age and occupation to play a trust game with stakes comparable to “in world” wages. In different treatments, the lab wall was adorned with an emotively suggestive photograph, a suggestive text was added to the instructions, or both a photo and text were added. We find high levels of trust and reciprocity that appear still higher for non-student and older subjects. Variation of results by treatment suggests that both photographic and textual cues influenced the level of trust but not that of trustworthiness.

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File URL: http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Economics/Papers/2010/2010-18_paper.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Brown University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2010-18.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:bro:econwp:2010-18

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Postal: Department of Economics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912

Related research

Keywords: trust; experiment; internet; virtual world; priming;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

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