Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this book chapter or follow this series

Systemic Risks in Global Banking: What Available Data Can Tell Us and What More Data Are Needed?

In: Risk Topography: Systemic Risk and Macro Modeling

Contents:

Author Info

  • Eugenio Cerutti
  • Stijn Claessens
  • Patrick McGuire

Abstract

The recent financial crisis has shown how interconnected the financial world has become. Shocks in one location or asset class can have a sizable impact on the stability of institutions and markets around the world. But systemic risk analysis is severely hampered by the lack of consistent data that capture the international dimensions of finance. While currently available data can be used more effectively, supervisors and other agencies need more and better data to construct even rudimentary measures of risks in the international financial system. Similarly, market participants need better information on aggregate positions and linkages to appropriately monitor and price risks. Ongoing initiatives that will help in closing data gaps include the G20 Data Gaps Initiative, which recommends the collection of consistent bank-level data for joint analyses and enhancements to existing sets of aggregate statistics, and the enhancement to the BIS international banking statistics.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c12557.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

as in new window

This chapter was published in:

  • Markus K. Brunnermeier & Arvind Krishnamurthy, 2014. "Risk Topography: Systemic Risk and Macro Modeling," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number brun11-1, octubre-d.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 12557.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:12557

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
    Phone: 617-868-3900
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.nber.org
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords:

    Other versions of this item:

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Eugenio Cerutti & Anna Ilyina & Yulia Makarova & Christian Schmieder, 2010. "Bankers Without Borders? Implications of Ring-Fencing for European Cross-Border Banks," Chapters in SUERF Studies, SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum.
    2. Ralph de Haas & Neeltje van Horen, 2011. "Running for the Exit: International Banks and Crisis Transmission," DNB Working Papers 279, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    3. Cerutti, Eugenio & Dell'Ariccia, Giovanni & Martinez Peria, Maria Soledad, 2007. "How banks go abroad: Branches or subsidiaries?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1669-1692, June.
    4. Claudio Borio & Claudio Mathias Drehmann, 2009. "Towards an operational framework for financial stability: "fuzzy" measurement and its consequences," BIS Working Papers 284, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Marcella Lucchetta & Gianni De Nicoló, 2012. "Systemic Real and Financial Risks," IMF Working Papers 12/58, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Mathias Drehmann & Nikola Tarashev, 2011. "Systemic importance: some simple indicators," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    7. Stephen Cecchetti & Ingo Fender & Kostas Patrick McGuire, 2010. "Toward a global risk map," BIS Working Papers 309, Bank for International Settlements.
    8. Aneta Hryckiewicz & Oskar Kowalewski, 2011. "Why Do Foreign Banks Withdraw from Other Countries?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(1), pages 67-102, 04.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Spiros Bougheas & Alan Kirman, 2014. "Complex Financial Networks and Systemic Risk: A Review," Discussion Papers 2014/04, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
    2. Martinez-Jaramillo, Serafin & Alexandrova-Kabadjova, Biliana & Bravo-Benitez, Bernardo & Solórzano-Margain, Juan Pablo, 2014. "An empirical study of the Mexican banking system’s network and its implications for systemic risk," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 242-265.
    3. Minoiu, Camelia & Reyes, Javier A., 2013. "A network analysis of global banking: 1978–2010," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 168-184.
    4. Samuel R\"onnqvist & Peter Sarlin, 2014. "Bank Networks from Text: Interrelations, Centrality and Determinants," Papers 1406.7752, arXiv.org.
    5. Manfred Borchert, 2013. "Der ESM und die europäischen Banken," Ifo Schnelldienst, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 66(23), pages 25-28, December.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:12557. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.