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Maternal nutrition knowledge versus schooling as determinants of child micronutrient status

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  • Steven A. Block

Abstract

This study considers the demand for child micronutrient status (represented by hemoglobin concentration). A central focus concerns the distinct roles of maternal schooling versus maternal nutrition knowledge as determinants of micronutrient status. Applying both parametric and non-parametric techniques to Indonesian household data, the study finds that critical determinants include: child gender and age, household expenditure levels, access to water, and maternal nutrition knowledge. Maternal schooling contributes to child micronutrient directly, but also through its effects on nutrition knowledge and household expenditures. Maternal nutrition knowledge substitutes for schooling, particularly at lower levels of income and schooling. Copyright 2007 , Oxford University Press.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpm001
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 59 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 330-353

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:59:y:2007:i:2:p:330-353

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Cited by:
  1. David Welsch & David Zimmer, 2010. "The Effect of Health and Poverty on Early Childhood Cognitive Development," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 38(1), pages 37-49, March.
  2. Monasa Aslam & Geeta Kingdon, 2010. "Parental Education and Child Health - Understanding the Pathways of Impact in Pakistan," Economics Series Working Papers CSAE WPS/2010-16, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. Rashid, Dewan Arif & Smith, Lisa C. & Rahman, Tauhidur, 2006. "Determinants of Dietary Quality: Evidence from Bangladesh," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21326, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  4. Ickowitz, Amy & Powell, Bronwen & Salim, Mohammad & Sunderland, Terry, 2013. "Dietary quality and tree cover in Africa," MPRA Paper 52906, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Amy Ickowitz, 2012. "Wealthiest Is Not Always Healthiest: What Explains Differences in Child Mortality in West Africa?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(2), pages 192-227, March.
  6. Hatton, Timothy J., 2011. "How have Europeans Grown so Tall?," CEPR Discussion Papers 8490, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Brown, Timothy Tyler, 2014. "How effective are public health departments at preventing mortality?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 34-45.

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