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Unemployment And Hours Of Work: The North Atlantic Divide Revisited

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  • Christopher A. Pissarides

Abstract

I examine the dynamic evolutions of unemployment, hours of work, and the service share since the war in the United States and Europe. The theoretical model brings together all three and emphasizes technological growth. Computations show that the very low unemployment in Europe in the 1960s was due to the high productivity growth associated with technological catch-up. Productivity also played a role in the dynamics of hours, but a full explanation for the fast rise of service employment and the big fall in aggregate hours needs further research. Taxation has played a role but results are mixed. Copyright 2007 by the Economics Department Of The University Of Pennsylvania And Osaka University Institute Of Social And Economic Research Association.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association in its journal International Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 48 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 (02)
Pages: 1-36

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Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:48:y:2007:i:1:p:1-36

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References

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  1. Edward C. Prescott, 2004. "Why do Americans Work so Much More than Europeans?," NBER Working Papers 10316, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Valerie A. Ramey & Neville Francis, 2009. "A Century of Work and Leisure," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 189-224, July.
  3. Robert Shimer, 2012. "Reassessing the Ins and Outs of Unemployment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(2), pages 127-148, April.
  4. Richard Rogerson, 2006. "Structural Transformation and the Labor Market," 2006 Meeting Papers 256, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  5. Christopher A. Pissarides & Giovanna Vallanti, 2007. "The Impact Of Tfp Growth On Steady-State Unemployment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 48(2), pages 607-640, 05.
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Cited by:
  1. Tournemaine, Frederic & Tsoukis, Christopher, 2010. "Gain versus pain from status and ambition: Effects on growth and inequality," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 286-294, April.
  2. Stéphane Auray & Samuel Danthine, 2008. "Bargaining Frictions, Labor Income Taxation and Economic Performance," Working Papers 2008-1, Universidad de Málaga, Department of Economic Theory, Málaga Economic Theory Research Center.
  3. Christopher Tsoukis & Frederic Tournemaine, 2011. "Social Conflict, Growth And Factor Shares," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(2), pages 283-304, 05.
  4. Richard Rogerson, 2006. "Understanding Differences in Hours Worked," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 9(3), pages 365-409, July.
  5. Emanuele Campiglio, 2013. "The structural shift to green services: A twosector growth model with public capital and open-access resources," Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment Working Papers 141, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  6. Keisuke Kawata, 2013. "Work Hour Mismatch and On-the-job Search," IDEC DP2 Series 3-6, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC).
  7. Noritaka Kudoh & Masaru Sasaki, 2007. "Employment and Hours of Work," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 07-35, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  8. Richard Rogerson & Robert Shimer, 2010. "Search in Macroeconomic Models of the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 15901, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Jorgenson, D.W. & Timmer, Marcel, 2010. "Structural Change in Advanced Nations: A New Set of Stylised Facts," GGDC Research Memorandum GD-115, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.
  10. de Meza, David & Lockwood, Ben, 2010. "Too much investment? A problem of endogenous outside options," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 503-511, July.
  11. Richard Rogerson & Johanna Wallenius, 2007. "Micro and Macro Elasticities in a Life Cycle Model With Taxes," NBER Working Papers 13017, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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