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Setting the minimum wage

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  • Boeri, Tito

Abstract

The process leading to the setting of the minimum wage so far has been overlooked by economists. There are two common ways of setting national minimum wages: they are either government legislated or the byproduct of collective bargaining agreements, which are extended erga omnes to all workers. We develop a simple model relating the level of the minimum wage to the setting regime. Next, we exploit a new data set on minimum wages in 68 countries having a statutory national minimum level of pay in the period 1981–2005. We find that a Government legislated minimum wage is lower than a wage floor set within collective agreements. This effect survives to several robustness checks and can be interpreted as a causal effect of the setting regime on the level of the minimum wage.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Labour Economics.

Volume (Year): 19 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 281-290

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Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:19:y:2012:i:3:p:281-290

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco

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Keywords: Minimum wages; Collective bargaining; Statutory minimum;

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  7. Silberman, Jonathan I & Durden, Garey C, 1976. "Determining Legislative Preferences on the Minimum Wage: An Economic Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(2), pages 317-29, April.
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  13. Hosios, Arthur J, 1990. "On the Efficiency of Matching and Related Models of Search and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(2), pages 279-98, April.
  14. André Sapir & Marco Buti, 1998. "Economic policy in EMU," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/8078, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  15. Boeri, Tito & Macis, Mario, 2010. "Do unemployment benefits promote or hinder job reallocation?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 109-125, September.
  16. Christopher J. Flinn, 2006. "Minimum Wage Effects on Labor Market Outcomes under Search, Matching, and Endogenous Contact Rates," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(4), pages 1013-1062, 07.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Benassi, Chiara, 2011. "The implementation of minimum wage : challenges and creative solutions," ILO Working Papers 462988, International Labour Organization.
  2. Andrea Garnero & Stephan Kampelmann & François Rycx, 2013. "Sharp Teeth or Empty Mouths? Revisiting the Minimum Wage Bite with Sectoral Data," Working Papers CEB 13-016, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  3. M. Ali Choudhary & Saima Mahmood & Sajawal Khan & Waqas Ahmed & Gylfi Zoega, 2013. "Sticky Wages in a Developing Country: Lessons from Structured Interviews in Pakistan," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0213, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  4. Pedro S. Martins, 2014. "30,000 minimum wages: The economic effects of collective agreement extensions," Working Papers 51, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
  5. Danziger, Eliav & Danziger, Leif, 2014. "A Pareto-Improving Minimum Wage," IZA Discussion Papers 8123, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Ive Marx & Sarah Marchal & Brian Nolan, 2012. "GINI DP 56: Mind the Gap: Net Incomes of Minimum Wage Workers in the EU and the US," GINI Discussion Papers 56, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  7. Eliav Danziger & Leif Danziger, 2014. "A Pareto-Improving Minimum Wage," CESifo Working Paper Series 4762, CESifo Group Munich.
  8. Salverda, Wiemer & Checchi, Daniele, 2014. "Labour-Market Institutions and the Dispersion of Wage Earnings," IZA Discussion Papers 8220, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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