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Fitting in: Group effects and the evolution of fundamentalism

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Author Info

  • Arce, Daniel G.
  • Sandler, Todd

Abstract

We provide an evolutionary model of conflict based on dyadic interactions within and between individuals drawn from a society containing fundamentalists and "others." Thus, the paper presents an asymmetric game representation of group effects. Fundamentalist control of society is inversely related to the degree of social stratification, and fundamentalists' intolerance of others. If, however, fundamentalism can be feigned (by displaying certain traits), then fundamentalists must balance their intolerance and insularity to take power. The model provides a novel means for distinguishing democratic versus open societies. This leads to a central result characterizing how fair and open societies can peacefully contravene fundamentalism.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Policy Modeling.

Volume (Year): 31 (2009)
Issue (Month): 5 (September)
Pages: 739-757

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:31:y:2009:i:5:p:739-757

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505735

Related research

Keywords: Evolution games Fundamentalism Assortative matching Nonassortative matching Social control Terrorism Asymmetric game Open society;

References

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  1. Jack Hirshleifer, 1998. "The Bioeconomic causes of war," UCLA Economics Working Papers 777, UCLA Department of Economics.
  2. Daniel G. Arce M. & Todd Sandler, 2003. "An Evolutionary Game Approach to Fundamentalism and Conflict," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 159(1), pages 132-, March.
  3. Nash, John, 1953. "Two-Person Cooperative Games," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 21(1), pages 128-140, April.
  4. Kuran, Timur, 1991. "The East European Revolution of 1989: Is It Surprising That We Were Surprised?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 121-25, May.
  5. Collier, Paul & Hoeffler, Anke, 2000. "Greed and grievance in civil war," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2355, The World Bank.
  6. Grossman, Herschel I, 1991. "A General Equilibrium Model of Insurrections," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 912-21, September.
  7. Ross Cressman, 2003. "Evolutionary Dynamics and Extensive Form Games," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262033054, January.
  8. Gil Epstein & Ira Gang, 2007. "Understanding the development of fundamentalism," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 132(3), pages 257-271, September.
  9. Enders, Walter & Sandler, Todd, 1999. "Transnational Terrorism in the Post-Cold War Era," Staff General Research Papers 1532, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  10. G. Daniel & M. Arce & Todd Sandler, 2005. "The Dilemma of the Prisoners' Dilemmas," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(1), pages 3-24, 02.
  11. Theodore C. Bergstrom, 2002. "Evolution of Social Behavior: Individual and Group Selection," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 67-88, Spring.
  12. Hansen, Robert G. & Samuelson, William F., 1988. "Evolution in economic games," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 315-338, October.
  13. Jack Hirshleifer, 2001. "The Bioeconomic Causes of War," Levine's Working Paper Archive 563824000000000021, David K. Levine.
  14. Dixit, Avinash K, 1987. "Strategic Behavior in Contests," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(5), pages 891-98, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Luca CORREANI & Fabio DI DIO & Giuseppe GAROFALO, 2010. "The Evolutionary Dynamics of Tolerance," Theoretical and Practical Research in Economic Fields, ASERS Publishing, vol. 0(2), pages 219 - 231, December.

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