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An Evolutionary Game Approach to Fundamentalism and Conflict

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  • Daniel G. Arce M.
  • Todd Sandler

Abstract

This paper investigates the evolutionary equilibria of a clash of cultures game where conflict results from failures to share social power in individual pairings. Members of a general subpopulation are matched with those of a fundamentalist subpopulation, the latter being more cohesive and insistent that their identity traits define the norms for, and outcomes of, social, economic, and political interaction. Simulations of the evolutionary dynamics reveal a tradeoff between the intolerance of fundamentalism and the likelihood of a takeover. This tradeoff is reversed if fundamentalism is falsifiable: affording non-fundamentalists the ability to signal fundamentalist traits produces a bandwagon effect.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen in its journal Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics.

Volume (Year): 159 (2003)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 132-

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Handle: RePEc:mhr:jinste:urn:sici:0932-4569(200303)159:1_132:aegatf_2.0.tx_2-a

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Cited by:
  1. Koch Michael & Tkach Benjamin, 2012. "Deterring or Mobilizing? The Influence of Government Partisanship and Force on the Frequency, Lethality and Suicide Attacks of Terror Events," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(2), pages 1-29, August.
  2. Correani, Luca & Di Dio, Fabio & Garofalo, Giuseppe, 2009. "The evolutionary dynamics of tolerance," MPRA Paper 18989, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Friedrich Schneider & Tilman Brück & Daniel Meierrieks, 2011. "The Economics of Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism: A Survey (Part II)," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 45, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Todd Sandler & H�vard Hegre, 2002. "Economic analysis of civil wars," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(6), pages 429-433.
  5. Gang, Ira N. & Epstein, Gil S., 2004. "Understanding the Development of Fundamentalism," IZA Discussion Papers 1227, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Arce, Daniel G. & Sandler, Todd, 2009. "Fitting in: Group effects and the evolution of fundamentalism," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 739-757, September.
  7. Werner Güth & Kerstin Pull, 2002. "Will Equity Evolve? - An Indirect Evolutionary Approach," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2002-22, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
  8. Bruno S. Frey & Simon Luechinger, . "Measuring Terrorism," IEW - Working Papers 171, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.

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