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When should I quit? Gender differences in exiting competitions

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Author Info

  • Hogarth, Robin M.
  • Karelaia, Natalia
  • Trujillo, Carlos Andrés

Abstract

We study gender differences in exiting competitive environments by exploiting the “naturalistic experiment” of a TV game show where participants were self-selected and there were no gender-specific constraints or discrimination. In multiple rounds, contestants answer general knowledge questions privately. One participant is eliminated or leaves voluntarily at the end of each round. Women earn 40% less than men and exit the game prematurely at a faster rate, but especially when in a minority. This latter result highlights the importance of structural arrangements in organizations that interact with behavior to maintain “glass ceilings” and explains the differential gender-related risk attitudes observed.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 83 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 136-150

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:83:y:2012:i:1:p:136-150

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

Related research

Keywords: Competition; Gender differences; Glass ceilings; Minority behaviors; Discrimination;

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References

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  15. Pavlo Blavatskyy & Ganna Pogrebna, 2008. "Risk Aversion when Gains are Likely and Unlikely: Evidence from a Natural Experiment with Large Stakes," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 64(2), pages 395-420, March.
  16. Pamela S. Tolbert & Alice Andrews & Tal Simons & Jaehoon Rhee, 1995. "The effects of gender composition in academic departments on faculty turnover," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 562-579, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Werner Boente & Monika Jarosch, 2011. "Gender Differences in Competitiveness, Risk Tolerance, and other Personality Traits: Do they contribute to the Gender Gap in Entrepreneurship?," Schumpeter Discussion Papers sdp11012, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
  2. Hanley, Aoife & Schmidt, Eike-Christian, 2013. "Women quitters in exit competitions: Reliable indicators of women's risk aversion?," Kiel Policy Brief 66, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  3. Werner Bönte & Monika Piegeler, 2013. "Gender gap in latent and nascent entrepreneurship: driven by competitiveness," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 961-987, December.
  4. Miklós Antal & Ardjan Gazheli & Jeroen van den Bergh, 2012. "Behavioral Foundations of Sustainability Transitions," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 3, WWWforEurope.
  5. Natalia Karelaia & Laura Guillén, 2011. "Identity challenges of women leaders: Antecedents and consequences of identity interference," ESMT Research Working Papers ESMT-11-13, ESMT European School of Management and Technology.

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