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Average work hours as a leading economic variable in US manufacturing industries

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  • Glosser, Stuart M.
  • Golden, Lonnie

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Journal of Forecasting.

Volume (Year): 13 (1997)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 175-195

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Handle: RePEc:eee:intfor:v:13:y:1997:i:2:p:175-195

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijforecast

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References

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  1. Hart, Robert A. & McGregor, Peter G., 1988. "The returns to labour services in West German manufacturing industry," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 947-963, April.
  2. Hashimoto, Mansanori, 1993. "Aspects of Labor Market Adjustments in Japan," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 136-61, January.
  3. Eli Berman & John Bound & Zvi Griliches, 1993. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing Industries: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufacturing," NBER Working Papers 4255, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Trejo, Stephen J, 1993. "Overtime Pay, Overtime Hours, and Labor Unions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(2), pages 253-78, April.
  5. Susan N. Houseman & Katharine G. Abraham, 1994. "Labor Adjustment Under Different Institutional Structures: A Case Study of Germany and the United States," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 94-26, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  6. Geoffrey H. Moore, 1983. "An Introduction to International Economic Indicators," NBER Chapters, in: Business Cycles, Inflation, and Forecasting, 2nd ed., pages 65-92 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Sharpe, Steven A, 1994. "Financial Market Imperfections, Firm Leverage, and the Cyclicality of Employment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 1060-74, September.
  8. Robert J. Gordon, 1993. "The Jobless Recovery: Does It Signal a New Era of Productivity-led Growth?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 24(1), pages 271-316.
  9. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1983. "New Measures of Labor Cost: Implications for Demand Elasticities and Nominal Wage Growth," NBER Chapters, in: The Measurement of Labor Cost, pages 287-308 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1990. "A Genral Model of Dynamic Labor Demand," NBER Working Papers 3356, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Basil J. Moore, 1995. "Sluggish Job Growth: Rising Productivity, Anemic Recovery, or Something Else?," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 17(3), pages 473-477, April.
  12. Toda, Hiro Y. & Yamamoto, Taku, 1995. "Statistical inference in vector autoregressions with possibly integrated processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1-2), pages 225-250.
  13. Van Audenrode, Marc A, 1994. "Short-Time Compensation: Job Security, and Employment Contracts: Evidence from Selected OECD Countries," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(1), pages 76-102, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Luis A. Gil-Alana, 2012. "Persistence and Cycles in US Hours Worked," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1200, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Stuart Glosser & Lonnie Golden, 2005. "Is labour becoming more or less flexible? Changing dynamic behaviour and asymmetries of labour input in US manufacturing," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(4), pages 535-557, July.
  3. Bernardi, Mauro & Della Corte, Giuseppe & Proietti, Tommaso, 2008. "Extracting the Cyclical Component in Hours Worked: a Bayesian Approach," MPRA Paper 8967, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Petri Böckerman, 2002. "Overtime in Finland," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 15(1), pages 36-54, Spring.
  5. Derek Yu & Adél Bosch, 2012. "Trends on the hours worked of the employed, 1997 - 2011," Working Papers 302, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  6. Andrew Figura, 2004. "Workweek flexibility and hours variation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-59, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

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